Next Article in Journal
Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Improves the Biological Features of Mouse Bone Marrow-Derived EPCs Partially through PI3K/AKT/eNOS/NO Pathway
Next Article in Special Issue
RNA-seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Anti-Obesity Effect of Green Tea Extract Using Zebrafish Obesity Models
Previous Article in Journal
Metal Concentration in Muscle and Digestive Gland of Common Octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from Two Coastal Site in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy)
Previous Article in Special Issue
The Association between Green and Black Tea Consumption on Successful Aging: A Combined Analysis of the ATTICA and MEDiterranean ISlands (MEDIS) Epidemiological Studies
Open AccessReview

Targeting Bacterial Biofilms by the Green Tea Polyphenol EGCG

Institut für Biologie/Mikrobiologie, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 10155 Berlin, Germany
Academic Editor: Helieh S. Oz
Molecules 2019, 24(13), 2403; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24132403
Received: 13 May 2019 / Revised: 24 June 2019 / Accepted: 25 June 2019 / Published: 29 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue EGCG, Green Tea and Polyphenols)
Bacterial biofilms are multicellular aggregates in which cells are embedded in an extracellular matrix of self-produced biopolymers. Being refractory to antibiotic treatment and host immune systems, biofilms are involved in most chronic infections, and anti-biofilm agents are being searched for urgently. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) was recently shown to act against biofilms by strongly interfering with the assembly of amyloid fibres and the production of phosphoethanolamin-modified cellulose fibrils. Mechanistically, this includes a direct inhibition of the fibre assembly, but also triggers a cell envelope stress response that down-regulates the synthesis of these widely occurring biofilm matrix polymers. Based on its anti-amyloidogenic properties, EGCG seems useful against biofilms involved in cariogenesis or chronic wound infection. However, EGCG seems inefficient against or may even sometimes promote biofilms which rely on other types of matrix polymers, suggesting that searching for ‘magic bullet’ anti-biofilm agents is an unrealistic goal. Combining molecular and ecophysiological aspects in this review also illustrates why plants control the formation of biofilms on their surfaces by producing anti-amyloidogenic compounds such as EGCG. These agents are not only helpful in combating certain biofilms in chronic infections but even seem effective against the toxic amyloids associated with neuropathological diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: bacterial biofilm; functional amyloid; curli fibre; bacterial exopolysaccharides; bacterial cellulose; chronic infection; antimicrobial bacterial biofilm; functional amyloid; curli fibre; bacterial exopolysaccharides; bacterial cellulose; chronic infection; antimicrobial
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hengge, R. Targeting Bacterial Biofilms by the Green Tea Polyphenol EGCG. Molecules 2019, 24, 2403.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map

1
Back to TopTop