Special Issue "The Relationship Between Poverty and Infectious Disease"

A special issue of Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease (ISSN 2414-6366).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Claudia Muñoz-Zanzi

School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Mayo 1260, 420 Delaware St SE, Minnesota 55454, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: infectious diseases; zoonoses; eco-epidemiology; social ecology of infectious diseases; One Health; community-based research; disease diagnosis and surveillance
Guest Editor
Dr. Zobeida Bonilla

School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, 1300 2nd St South, Suite 300, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Latino/a health; global health; Caribbean; medical anthropology; qualitative research; qualitative program evaluation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2013, according to the World Bank, an estimated 767 million people or 10.7% of the world’s population were living under the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day. These estimates revealed that progress is being made, mostly in East and South Asia and the Pacific region, yet poverty remains unacceptably high. Similarly, Sustainable Development Goals indicators show that major advances have been made in combating infectious diseases. However, a significant amount of infectious diseases disproportionately affects people living in poverty. Poverty is often found to be a strong risk factor for acquiring infectious diseases as detrimental living conditions increase vulnerability and exposure. Furthermore, disease outcomes among people living in poverty may be also be worse because of lack of access to quality care, underlying conditions, co-morbidities, lack of social support, etc. There is a need to understand further how poverty is produced, reproduced, and structurally sustained creating excess of disease among the most vulnerable members of society.

This Special Issue focuses on the biological, epidemiological, sociocultural, and environmental factors influencing the association between poverty and infectious diseases over the life cycle. Research is needed on lifecourse epidemiology to understand lifelong detrimental consequences of some infections (i.e., biological and social consequences of infections acquired congenitally or at an early age), implementation of public health programs under low resource settings and under challenging conditions (i.e., migrations, refugee camps, natural disasters),  and novel technologies or interventions for diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases affecting mostly the poor who do not access to timely and affordable health care.  

Dr. Claudia Muñoz-Zanzi
Dr. Zobeida Bonilla
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • infectious diseases
  • neglected tropical diseases
  • poverty
  • refugee health
  • climate change
  • health disparities
  • social determinants of health
  • implementation research
  • sociopolitical factors
  • economic factors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Burden of Acute Respiratory Infections Among Under-Five Children in Relation to Household Wealth and Socioeconomic Status in Bangladesh
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010036
Received: 7 December 2018 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 8 February 2019 / Published: 12 February 2019
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Abstract
Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), as a group of diseases and symptoms, are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among under-five children in tropical countries like Bangladesh. Currently, no clear evidence has been published on the prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of ARIs in [...] Read more.
Acute respiratory infections (ARIs), as a group of diseases and symptoms, are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among under-five children in tropical countries like Bangladesh. Currently, no clear evidence has been published on the prevalence and socioeconomic correlates of ARIs in Bangladesh. In this regard, we carried out this study with the aim of assessing the prevalence and the socioeconomic predictors of ARIs among children aged 0–59 months, with a special focus on socioeconomic status and wealth-related indicators. Cross-sectional data on 32,998 mother-child (singleton) pairs were collected from six rounds of Bangladesh Demographic and Health Surveys (BDHS 1997–2014). The outcome variable were presence of the common symptoms of ARIs, fever and dyspnea, during the previous two weeks, which were measured based on mothers’ reports about the symptoms of these conditions. Explanatory variables included maternal demographic and socioeconomic factors such as age, education, occupation, wealth quintile, and child’s age and sex. The prevalence and predictors of ARIs were measured using descriptive and multivariate regression methods. The prevalence of both fever (31.00% in 1997 vs. 36.76% in 2014) and dyspnea (39.27% in 1997 vs. 43.27% in 2014) has increased gradually since 1997, and tended to be higher in households in the lower wealth quintiles. Multivariable analysis revealed that higher maternal educational status, access to improved water and sanitation facilities, and living in households in higher wealth quintiles had protective effects against both fever and dyspnea. Findings suggested a significantly negative association between lacking access to improved water and sanitation and use of biomass fuel with ARI symptoms. However, no sex difference was observed in these associations. Based on the findings, childhood ARI prevention strategies should address the risk factors stemming from parental socioeconomic marginalisation, household water and sanitation poverty, and use of unclean fuel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship Between Poverty and Infectious Disease)
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Open AccessArticle The Role of Routine Culture in the Treatment of Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media: Implications for the Standard of Care in Rural Areas of South Africa
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010010
Received: 9 December 2018 / Revised: 3 January 2019 / Accepted: 3 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
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Abstract
Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) is a widely prevalent disease, which is a leading cause of acquired deafness worldwide, and is associated with complications with significant mortality and morbidity. It often responds poorly to standard of care therapy and places a disproportionate burden [...] Read more.
Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM) is a widely prevalent disease, which is a leading cause of acquired deafness worldwide, and is associated with complications with significant mortality and morbidity. It often responds poorly to standard of care therapy and places a disproportionate burden on at-risk populations. The microbiology and antibiotic resistance of CSOM varies based on local factors, including health care access, comorbidities, and antibiotic prescribing practices. We evaluated the role and feasibility of using routine culture for the treatment of CSOM in rural areas as a means of improving treatment of CSOM. More than 400 patients were screened in a rural clinic in South Africa over six weeks, and 14 met study criteria and consented for participation. Gram-negative organisms predominated overall, although Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated single species. A majority of the pathogens were relatively sensitive to commonly prescribed antibiotics, but two cases of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus were cultured, and one patient grew a Scedosporium species. Treatment on follow-up was able to be directed by culture results, suggesting routine culture at the initial point of contact with the health care system may play a pivotal role in addressing this widely prevalent and devastating disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Relationship Between Poverty and Infectious Disease)
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