Special Issue "Young People, Sexual Health and Sexual Rights"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Malin Lindroth
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Sexology and Sexuality Studies, Malmö University, Malmo 205 06, Sweden
Interests: interdisciplinary research areas; sexology; health and medical services in society

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Having one’s sexual rights acknowledged can be understood as a prerequisite for experiencing sexual health and well-being. Young people below the age of 18 often lack legal or factual autonomy. In particular, they may lack access to youth-friendly and accurate information and education that protect and promote their sexual health, and respect their sexual rights. This makes them a vulnerable group.

The report of the Guttmacher–Lancet Commission (Starrs et al., 2018) on sexual and reproductive health and rights for all describe young people as a population in need of improved services, since “many social, gender, cultural, and legal barriers prevent adolescents from obtaining high-quality sexual and reproductive health information and services” (p. 2668). In addition, the Convention on the Rights of the Child is clear. The General comment no. 15 (2013) on the right to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health (art. 24) stresses the recognition of equal rights related to sexual and reproductive health; and equal access to information, education, justice and security; including the elimination of all forms of sexual and gender-based violence.

In light of this, research that highlights young people as sexual agents, and that highlight how young peoples’ sexual health and rights are protected and promoted, is vital. We invite papers that present empirical, theoretical, policy-related, or practice-related contributions to the field of young people and sexual health and sexual rights.

Dr. Malin Lindroth
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • agency
  • sexual and reproductive health and rights
  • young people
  • youth-friendly services

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
The Economic Consequences of Decriminalizing Sex Work in Washington, DC—A Conceptual Model
Societies 2021, 11(3), 112; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11030112 (registering DOI) - 17 Sep 2021
Viewed by 260
Abstract
(1) Under repressive policies, sex workers are at disproportionate risk for violence and sexually transmitted infections. The decriminalization of sex work provides increased social and health benefits to both sex workers and society. This is the first research that complements human rights-based messages [...] Read more.
(1) Under repressive policies, sex workers are at disproportionate risk for violence and sexually transmitted infections. The decriminalization of sex work provides increased social and health benefits to both sex workers and society. This is the first research that complements human rights-based messages with a quantifiable economic impact of such a law and a model for future calculations. (2) This research assesses the potential economic consequences of decriminalizing sex work in the District of Columbia (DC) in three areas: (A) income tax revenue, (B) criminal justice system savings, and (C) health sector savings (due to averted cases of violence, HIV, gonorrhea, and herpes). (3) An economic model is developed and utilized based on data from a literature search and agency records. (4) Decriminalizing sex work in DC will generate USD5348.68 per sex worker and USD2.53 per client annually, plus USD20,118.48 in criminal justice system savings a year. Per sex worker, USD5058.08 will be gained from income tax revenue, and USD290.60 will be generated through health sector savings (USD274.65, 0.02, 15.64, and 0.29 from averted cases of violence, HIV, gonorrhea, and herpes, respectively). Per client, decriminalization will generate USD0.05, 2.32, and 0.16 from averted cases of HIV, gonorrhea, and herpes, respectively, or USD8462.35 annually, after considering the total number of clients. Estimates are reported in 2020 USD. (5) The potential economic impact of decriminalizing sex work is widespread. The presented model, in conjunction with a rights-based foundation, should urgently be used by advocates, sex workers, decision makers, and other researchers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Young People, Sexual Health and Sexual Rights)
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Article
Correlates of Non-Partner Physical Violence among Ethiopian Women
Societies 2021, 11(3), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc11030068 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 381
Abstract
Intimate and non-partner violence against women are major societal and public health problems afflicting many women around the world. Unlike intimate partner violence (IPV), non-partner violence (NPV) has not been well researched in Ethiopia. Thus, individual, physical, social, and environmental factors associated with [...] Read more.
Intimate and non-partner violence against women are major societal and public health problems afflicting many women around the world. Unlike intimate partner violence (IPV), non-partner violence (NPV) has not been well researched in Ethiopia. Thus, individual, physical, social, and environmental factors associated with NPV are largely unknown. For the study, we used national data collected in the 2016 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Survey. The survey sample was selected with two-stage stratified cluster sampling. Multivariate logistic regression model was fitted to understand the association between NPV and its correlates. Overall, 45% of the women reported having experienced physical NPV in Ethiopia. Women who owned assets, solely or jointly (land, house, or both), were 70% less likely to report NPV than women who had no such assets. Thus, structural interventions that integrate women’s asset ownership and provide special microfinancing services for women along with community-based gender education programs may have a potential to reduce violence against women in Ethiopia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Young People, Sexual Health and Sexual Rights)
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