Optics and Photonics: Technologies, Methods and Facilities in the 21st Century Teaching

A special issue of Optics (ISSN 2673-3269).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 August 2023) | Viewed by 11763

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Science and Engineering, Saint Louis University—Madrid Campus, 28003 Madrid, Spain
Interests: optics and photonics; virtual and remote labs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to show the latest innovations and developments in teaching optics and photonics from mid/high-school to university level. The main objective is to share the new trends in teaching optics and photonics using innovative, engaging approaches. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of interactive learning systems, where the students can increase their learning experience by using optics and photonics simulations and/or managing real equipment remotely. At the same time, our special issue also would like to focus on the recent development, research highlights in optical and photonics materials, devices and technologies that could be used in optics teaching.

The submissions should concern, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Interactive optics simulations in Optics and Photonics;
  • New trends and developments in optical devices could be used in optics teaching such as sensors and detectors;
  • Novel optical, opto-electronic and photonic materials that could be used in optics teaching;
  • Remote management of Optics and Photonics instrumentation;
  • Effective use of LMS (Learning Management Systems) for Optics and Photonics teaching;
  • AR (Augmented Reality) based systems for Optics and Photonics teaching;
  • Gamming proposals for Optics and Photonics teaching;
  • Methods to evaluation the effectiveness of the proposed teaching innovations in Optics and Photonics.

Looking forward to seeing your innovative teaching proposals, methods and technology in Optics and Photonics field!

Dr. Javier Gamo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Optics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Optics and Photonics
  • Innovative teaching
  • Virtual and remote labs

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 14646 KiB  
Article
Innovative Approaches for Organizing an Inclusive Optics and Photonics Conference in Virtual Format
by Alba de las Heras, Ana I. Gómez-Varela, María-Baralida Tomás, Rosa Ana Perez-Herrera, Luis Alberto Sánchez, Francesca Gallazzi, Beatriz Santamaría Fernández, Mario Garcia-Lechuga, Maria Vinas-Pena, Martina Delgado-Pinar and Verónica González-Fernández
Optics 2023, 4(1), 156-170; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt4010012 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2065
Abstract
The COVID pandemic is forcing the renewal of scientific conferences, offering opportunities to introduce technological and inclusive developments. Our analysis focuses on the implementation of inclusive practices for female and early-career researchers in a virtual scientific conference. This organization approach was applied in [...] Read more.
The COVID pandemic is forcing the renewal of scientific conferences, offering opportunities to introduce technological and inclusive developments. Our analysis focuses on the implementation of inclusive practices for female and early-career researchers in a virtual scientific conference. This organization approach was applied in the XIII Spanish Optical Meeting (RNO2021), which was also characterized by avatars interacting in an online metaverse. The effectiveness of inclusive policies and novel technological tools was evaluated using the participation data and a post-conference survey. Our study reveals the high impact of inclusive actions and a strong interest in the scientific community to explore conference advances. Full article
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21 pages, 349 KiB  
Article
Improving Early Optics Instruction Using a Phenomenological Approach: A Field Study
by Kai Fliegauf, Janika Sebald, Joaquin Marc Veith, Henrike Spiecker and Philipp Bitzenbauer
Optics 2022, 3(4), 409-429; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt3040035 - 9 Nov 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2455
Abstract
Previous research has shown that phenomenological approaches in early optics education might be superior to traditional model-based instruction based on the light ray realm with regards to fostering students’ conceptual understanding of basic optics topics. However, it remains open to date which learning [...] Read more.
Previous research has shown that phenomenological approaches in early optics education might be superior to traditional model-based instruction based on the light ray realm with regards to fostering students’ conceptual understanding of basic optics topics. However, it remains open to date which learning difficulties students encounter when being introduced to optics following a phenomenological approach—in particular, in comparison to the learning difficulties that are widespread among students introduced to optics via traditional model-based instruction. With this article, we contribute to closing this gap: We report the results of a quasi-experimental field study with N=189 secondary school students. We used ten items adapted from the literature in a pre-posttest design for an in-depth exploration of the conceptions of introductory optics topics acquired by N=89 students introduced to optics following a phenomenological teaching-learning sequence and compare these students’ conceptions to the ones acquired by N=100 peers who participated in traditional model-based instruction covering the same content topics. The results of this study substantiate earlier findings according to which phenomenological teaching might be a fruitful endeavour for early optics education, in particular, when it comes to teaching and learning about image formation by converging lenses. Full article
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8 pages, 2231 KiB  
Article
Diffraction Testbed for Use in Remote Teaching
by Javier Gamo
Optics 2021, 2(4), 251-258; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt2040023 - 7 Nov 2021
Viewed by 2627
Abstract
The need for remote teaching tools in all education levels has experienced a big increase due to COVID-19 pandemic. Laboratory practical sessions have not been an exception, and many online and offline tools have been made available to respond to the lockdown of [...] Read more.
The need for remote teaching tools in all education levels has experienced a big increase due to COVID-19 pandemic. Laboratory practical sessions have not been an exception, and many online and offline tools have been made available to respond to the lockdown of teaching facilities. This paper presents a software testbed named OPTILAB for teaching diffraction experiments to engineering students. The software simulates classical diffraction apertures (single slit, double slit, circular slit) under a wide variety of conditions. Explanation about the Physics behind the diffraction phenomenon is also included in OPTILAB to increase the students’ self-learning experience. Originally conceived as a complement to on-site teaching, due to COVID-19 pandemic OPTILAB has been adopted as the basic tool to build a brand-new, virtual laboratory session about diffraction in Physics III course (biomedical engineering) at Carlos III University of Madrid. Results obtained by the students taking this virtual lab during Fall 2020 are presented and discussed. Full article
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8 pages, 1393 KiB  
Article
Gamification for Photonics Students: Labescape
by Rosa Ana Pérez-Herrera, Santiago Tainta and Cesar Elosúa
Optics 2021, 2(4), 228-235; https://doi.org/10.3390/opt2040021 - 13 Oct 2021
Viewed by 2562
Abstract
The idea of utilizing game elements in non-gaming situations has sparked a lot of attention in recent years, especially in topics such as education and training. Game-based techniques appear to be an increasing trend in a wide range of learning areas, including health, [...] Read more.
The idea of utilizing game elements in non-gaming situations has sparked a lot of attention in recent years, especially in topics such as education and training. Game-based techniques appear to be an increasing trend in a wide range of learning areas, including health, social policy, and engineering, among others, not only in primary school but also in higher formal education. Using this methodology, the learning process becomes more stimulating while also reaching a competitive level in some circumstances. In the present work, the authors propose a new gamification strategy based on an escape-room in which all the puzzles to be passed are related to the area of optics and photonics and use readily available or low-cost equipment. The major field of application of this novel teaching strategy will be the practical section of a course, that is usually carried out in a laboratory, and will be aimed at both undergraduate and master’s degree students. A coevaluation method is also proposed where the rest of the students will provide valuable feedback to each one of their colleagues and to the instructor. Full article
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