Advances in the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Risk Stratification of Hypertension

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Acquired Cardiovascular Disease".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 5090

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail
Guest Editor
1. Department of Medicine and Technological Innovation, University of Insubria, 21100 Varese, Italy
2. Department of Medicine and Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, Maugeri Care and Research Institutes, IRCCS Tradate, 21049 Tradate, Italy
Interests: cardiovascular risk assessment in patients with hypertension; diabetes; heart failure and coronary artery disease; evaluation of cardiovascular treatment; diagnosis and treatment of acute myocardial infarction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hypertension is the most frequent chronic and non-communicable disease in the world, with approximately 1.5 billion affected individuals worldwide. Hypertension remains largely underdiagnosed and undertreated, with consequent low rates of blood pressure control.

Optimal blood pressure should be further explored in the general hypertensive population and in specific subgroups at risk of cardiovascular disease. In this context, digital/health technology is expected to be increasingly used, improving the diagnosis of hypertension and the helping in achievement of adequate blood pressure control at the population level.

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect reviews and original articles discussing the main trends and perspectives related to the basic mechanisms, clinical diagnosis, treatment, and risk stratification of hypertension. More specifically, this Special Issue mainly focuses on advances in the management of hypertensive patients that could play a clinical role in the years to come.

Prof. Dr. Fabio Angeli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • hypertension
  • treatment
  • cardiovascular risk
  • prognosis
  • diagnosis

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

12 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Virtual Reality for Patient Education about Hypertension: A Randomized Pilot Study
by Bogna Jiravska Godula, Otakar Jiravsky, Gabriela Matheislova, Veronika Kuriskova, Alena Valkova, Kristina Puskasova, Martin Dokoupil, Veronika Dvorakova, Arber Prifti, Daniel Foral, Filip Jiravsky, Jan Hecko, Miroslav Hudec, Radek Neuwirth and Roman Miklik
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(12), 481; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10120481 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1567
Abstract
Background: Hypertension challenges arise in part from poor adherence due to inadequate patient education. VR offers immersive learning to improve hypertension knowledge. Objective: To compare VR education with traditional verbal education to improve hypertension knowledge. Methods: In this randomised trial, 182 patients with [...] Read more.
Background: Hypertension challenges arise in part from poor adherence due to inadequate patient education. VR offers immersive learning to improve hypertension knowledge. Objective: To compare VR education with traditional verbal education to improve hypertension knowledge. Methods: In this randomised trial, 182 patients with hypertension were assigned to receive either traditional physician-led education (n = 88) or VR education (n = 94) with equivalent content. The VR group experienced a 3D video using Oculus Quest 2 headsets. Knowledge was assessed post-intervention using a 29-item questionnaire. The primary outcome was the objective score. Subjective satisfaction and responder characteristics were secondary outcomes. Results: Median objective scores were significantly higher for VR (14, IQR 3) versus traditional education (10, IQR 5), p < 0.001, indicating superior hypertension knowledge acquisition with VR. Subjective satisfaction was high in both groups. Participants were categorized into low (first quartile) and medium-high (second to fourth quartiles) responders based on their scores. Low responders had a significantly higher prevalence of older women than medium-high responders (57% vs. 40% female, p = 0.024; 68 vs. 65 years), p = 0.036). Conclusions: VR outperforms traditional education. Tailoring to groups such as older women can optimise learning. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research

15 pages, 669 KiB  
Review
Genetics of Hypertension: From Monogenic Analysis to GETomics
by Martina Zappa, Michele Golino, Paolo Verdecchia and Fabio Angeli
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(5), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11050154 - 18 May 2024
Viewed by 262
Abstract
Arterial hypertension is the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor all over the world, and it is one of the leading drivers of the risk of cardiovascular events and death. It is a complex trait influenced by heritable and environmental factors. To date, the [...] Read more.
Arterial hypertension is the most frequent cardiovascular risk factor all over the world, and it is one of the leading drivers of the risk of cardiovascular events and death. It is a complex trait influenced by heritable and environmental factors. To date, the World Health Organization estimates that 1.28 billion adults aged 30–79 years worldwide have arterial hypertension (defined by European guidelines as office systolic blood pressure ≥ 140 mmHg or office diastolic blood pressure ≥ 90 mmHg), and 7.1 million die from this disease. The molecular genetic basis of primary arterial hypertension is the subject of intense research and has recently yielded remarkable progress. In this review, we will discuss the genetics of arterial hypertension. Recent studies have identified over 900 independent loci associated with blood pressure regulation across the genome. Comprehending these mechanisms not only could shed light on the pathogenesis of the disease but also hold the potential for assessing the risk of developing arterial hypertension in the future. In addition, these findings may pave the way for novel drug development and personalized therapeutic strategies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1455 KiB  
Review
Exercise-Induced Blood Pressure Dynamics: Insights from the General Population and the Athletic Cohort
by Petra Pesova, Bogna Jiravska Godula, Otakar Jiravsky, Libor Jelinek, Marketa Sovova, Katarina Moravcova, Jaromir Ozana, Libor Gajdusek, Roman Miklik, Libor Sknouril, Radek Neuwirth and Eliska Sovova
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2023, 10(12), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd10120480 - 29 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2848
Abstract
Blood pressure (BP) dynamics during graded exercise testing provide important insights into cardiovascular health, particularly in athletes. These measurements, taken during intense physical exertion, complement and often enhance our understanding beyond traditional resting BP measurements. Historically, the challenge has been to distinguish ‘normal’ [...] Read more.
Blood pressure (BP) dynamics during graded exercise testing provide important insights into cardiovascular health, particularly in athletes. These measurements, taken during intense physical exertion, complement and often enhance our understanding beyond traditional resting BP measurements. Historically, the challenge has been to distinguish ‘normal’ from ‘exaggerated’ BP responses in the athletic environment. While basic guidelines have served their purpose, they may not fully account for the complex nature of BP responses in today’s athletes, as illuminated by contemporary research. This review critically evaluates existing guidelines in the context of athletic performance and cardiovascular health. Through a rigorous analysis of the current literature, we highlight the multifaceted nature of exercise-induced BP fluctuations in athletes, emphasising the myriad determinants that influence these responses, from specific training regimens to inherent physiological nuances. Our aim is to advocate a tailored, athlete-centred approach to BP assessment during exercise. Such a paradigm shift is intended to set the stage for evidence-based guidelines to improve athletic training, performance and overall cardiovascular well-being. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop