Special Issue "Technologies Enabling Smart Grid in Distribution Networks and Microgrids 2.0"

A special issue of Inventions (ISSN 2411-5134). This special issue belongs to the section "Inventions and Innovation in Electrical Engineering/Energy/Communications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2022 | Viewed by 3990

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Emilio Ghiani
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e architettura, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: smart grids; renewable energy; energy storage devices; energy distribution systems
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Paolo Attilio Pegoraro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Cagliari, 09123 Cagliari, Italy
Interests: new measurement techniques; measurement uncertainty and propagation analysis; measurements for modern power networks; synchronized instruments; distributed measurement systems; power system state estimation; compressive sensing methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues.

Distributed automation, protection, measurements and ICT architectures are the basis of modern power grids, particularly at distribution levels. Power distribution systems require a pervasive communication infrastructure, covering the entire power grid, from transformer substations down to the end-customer, according to the smart grid paradigm.

The increasing diffusion of distributed energy resources (DER), including electric vehicles, requires the deployment of systems for the scheduling and management of energy flows inside the network, as well as for improved network operation, consumer efficiency in consumption and participation in competitive markets. The optimal management of the grid requires the adoption of distributed measurement systems, such as power quality meters and phasor measurement units, able to transfer, in real-time, measurement information to the distribution system operator (DSO) control center.

The aim of this Special Issue is to investigate emerging technologies, which are required in the design and implementation of future smart grids.

This issue welcomes theoretical papers, methodological studies, and empirical research on the design and implementation of smart grids, concerning (but not limited to) the application of: Information and communication technologies, smart meters and sensors, phasor measurement units, innovative protection and control systems, energy management systems for active networks, microgrids, and e-mobility, and systems and frameworks for demand response management.

Dr. Emilio Ghiani
Prof. Dr. Paolo Attilio Pegoraro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Inventions is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • communication systems for smart grids
  • active distribution network
  • smart meters and sensors
  • phasor measurement unit
  • micro-grid management
  • e-mobility management
  • demand response management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Extending DC Bus Signaling and Droop Control for Hybrid Storage Units to Improve the Energy Management and Voltage Regulation
Inventions 2022, 7(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions7030055 - 30 Jun 2022
Viewed by 452
Abstract
DC bus-voltage signaling (DBS) and droop control are often used in DC nano and microgrids with decentralized distributed energy resources (DERs). This technique effectively enforces the appropriate contributions of power sources and energy storage systems (ESSs) in steady-state situations. The usage of super [...] Read more.
DC bus-voltage signaling (DBS) and droop control are often used in DC nano and microgrids with decentralized distributed energy resources (DERs). This technique effectively enforces the appropriate contributions of power sources and energy storage systems (ESSs) in steady-state situations. The usage of super capacitors (SCs) in conjunction with batteries in a hybrid energy storage system (HESS) has recently been shown to reduce the influence of high and fast current changes on the losses and lifetime of the battery units. However, regulating the HESS as a single unit eliminates the SC’s potential contribution in improving power quality in a DC nanogrid due to its high-power capabilities. This work discusses employing a dual-droop coefficient to expand DC bus signaling and droop control by introducing a second droop constant in the range of the ESS’s droop constant. The suggested droop constant allows the SC to participate in power-sharing in the steady state. The voltage regulation will improve by decreasing the DC bus voltage variation with the load or power variation in the DC nanogrid. Furthermore, in the droop zone, the battery’s current variation is less, resulting in a smoother transition in the battery current. In addition to this, the contribution that SCs make to the slow component is variable, which is something that might be accomplished by having a changing threshold voltage in the I vs. V curve. Full article
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Article
Low Latency 5G Distributed Wireless Network Architecture: A Techno-Economic Comparison
Inventions 2021, 6(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions6010011 - 24 Jan 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1333
Abstract
The most profound requirements of fifth-generation (5G) technology implementations are the architecture design and the radio base station technology to capably run applications such as device-to-device, machine-to machine and internet of things at a reduced latency. Owing to these requirements, the implementation of [...] Read more.
The most profound requirements of fifth-generation (5G) technology implementations are the architecture design and the radio base station technology to capably run applications such as device-to-device, machine-to machine and internet of things at a reduced latency. Owing to these requirements, the implementation of 5G technology is very expensive to mobile network operators (MNO). In this study we modified the existing 4G network to form a distributed wireless network architecture (DWNA); the picocell and distributed antenna system were modified to support the enabling technology of 5G technology were a multi-edge computer (MEC), software-defined networking (SDN), massive multiple input multiple output (MIMO), ultra-dense network (UDN), Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) and device-to-device (D2D) communication at a reduced cost of ownership, improved coverage and capacity. We present a mathematical model for operational expenditure, capital expenditure and total cost of ownership (TCO) for the DWNA. A mathematical model for DWNA capacity and throughput was presented. Result shows that it is very economical for MNO to rent the space of the tower infrastructure from tower companies. The sensitivity analysis also shows a significant reduction in TCO for both the modified picocell and modified distributed antenna systems. Full article
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Article
Voltage Differential Protection for Series Arc Fault Detection in Low-Voltage DC Systems
Inventions 2021, 6(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/inventions6010005 - 31 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1391
Abstract
Series arc faults are challenging to detect in low-voltage dc (LVDC) distribution systems because, unlike other fault types, series arc faults result in only small changes in the current and voltage waveforms. Though there have been several approaches proposed to detect series arc [...] Read more.
Series arc faults are challenging to detect in low-voltage dc (LVDC) distribution systems because, unlike other fault types, series arc faults result in only small changes in the current and voltage waveforms. Though there have been several approaches proposed to detect series arc faults, each approach has its requirements and limitations. A step change in the current and voltage waveforms at the arc inception is one of the characteristic signatures of these faults that can be extracted without requiring one to sample the waveforms at a very high frequency. This characteristic feature is utilized to present a novel approach based on voltage differential protection to detect series arc faults in LVDC systems. The proposed method is demonstrated using an embedded controller and experimental data that emulate a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) test environment. The successful detection of series arc faults on two sets of series arc fault experimental data validated the approach. The results presented also illustrate the computational feasibility in implementing the approach in a real-time environment using an embedded controller. In addition, the paper discusses the robustness of the approach to load changes and loss of time synchronization between measurements at the two terminals of the line. Full article
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