Geomorphological Mapping Research for Landslide

A special issue of GeoHazards (ISSN 2624-795X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 2558

Special Issue Editor

Department of Natural and Environmental Risks, Regional Agency for Environmental Protection of Piemonte, 10135 Turin, Italy
Interests: landslide; debris flow; natural hazard; geohazard
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gravitational phenomena are one of the most common geomorphological hazards that mainly affect mountain, hilly and submarine environments, but also lowland environments where sinkhole phenomena occur. Landslides are responsible for serious and extensive damage to the anthropic and natural goods and cause numerous victims every year all over the world. In fact, these are included among the most frequent and widespread geological hazards that cause a great economic loss, both in terms of damage and in terms of cost for the prevention and mitigation of the hazard and risk associated with these phenomena.

There are many types of landslides with very different characteristics and behaviors whose predisposing and triggering causes are equally numerous and diversified. For this reason, landslide research is divided into several fields of investigation aimed at understanding their characteristics, trigger mechanisms and evolution.

The first step in studying landslides is to identify them in the area by mapping them via traditional methodologies, such as geomorphological surveys and aerial photo interpretation, or through the most modern remote sensing techniques.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to collect scientific works aimed at mapping landslides and the applications that derive from them, such as the production of inventory maps, susceptibility maps, hazard/risk maps, urban planning, and the development of tools in a GIS environment aimed at collecting, processing, analysis, visualization and dissemination of landslide data.

Dr. Davide Tiranti
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • landslide geomorphology
  • landslide detection
  • landslide inventory
  • landslide hazard mapping
  • landslide susceptibility map
  • landslides in GIS development
  • landslide risk assessment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 9640 KiB  
Article
The Lac Fallère Area as an Example of the Interplay between Deep-Seated Gravitational Slope Deformation and Glacial Shaping (Aosta Valley, NW Italy)
GeoHazards 2024, 5(1), 38-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/geohazards5010003 - 11 Jan 2024
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Abstract
The Lac Fallère area in the upper Clusellaz Valley (tributary of the middle Aosta Valley) is shaped in micaschist and gneiss (Mont Fort Unit, Middle Penninic) and in calcschist and marble (Aouilletta Unit, Combin Zone). Lac Fallère exhibits an elongated shape and is [...] Read more.
The Lac Fallère area in the upper Clusellaz Valley (tributary of the middle Aosta Valley) is shaped in micaschist and gneiss (Mont Fort Unit, Middle Penninic) and in calcschist and marble (Aouilletta Unit, Combin Zone). Lac Fallère exhibits an elongated shape and is hosted in a WSW–ENE-trending depression, according to the slope direction. This lake also shows a semi-submerged WSW–ENE rocky ridge that longitudinally divides the lake. This evidence, in addition to the extremely fractured rocks, indicates a wide, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD), even if this area is not yet included within the regional landslide inventory of the Aosta Valley Region. The Lac Fallère area also shows reliefs involved in glacial erosion (roches moutonnée), an extensive cover of subglacial sediments, and many moraines essentially referred to as Lateglacial. The DSGSD evolution in a glacial environment produced, as observed in other areas, effects on the facies of Quaternary sediments and the formation of a lot of wide moraines. Glacial slope sectors and lateral moraines displaced by minor scarps and counterscarps, and glaciers using trenches forming several arched moraines, suggest an interplay between glacial and gravitational processes, which share part of their evolution history. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomorphological Mapping Research for Landslide)
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0 pages, 4751 KiB  
Article
Climate Change Impacts on Shallow Landslide Events and on the Performance of the Regional Shallow Landslide Early Warning System of Piemonte (Northwestern Italy)
GeoHazards 2023, 4(4), 475-496; https://doi.org/10.3390/geohazards4040027 - 04 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Shallow landslides are one of the most dangerous gravitational phenomena. They are responsible for more than 50% of causalities due to landslides in northwestern Italy in the last century. The aim of the research study presented here is focused on understanding if and [...] Read more.
Shallow landslides are one of the most dangerous gravitational phenomena. They are responsible for more than 50% of causalities due to landslides in northwestern Italy in the last century. The aim of the research study presented here is focused on understanding if and how climate change influences the occurrence and behavior of this landslide type. A total of 120 widespread shallow landslide events have been analyzed from 1960 to 2019, taking into account the spatial and time distribution in association with related rainfall historical data elaborated by the Optimal Interpolation (OI) model. Results underline that shallow landslide events’ number (aggregated per five-year intervals) is characterized by a weak trend consisting of a slight increase in the Alps and a more pronounced decrease in the hilly and Apennines environments. In addition, the trend of the annual accumulated rainfall average shows a weak drop in the winter season of about 9 mm in ten years. Moreover, the rainy days have generally decreased over the hills and Apennines, while in the Alps, only in the summer season, with a decreasing rate of about 1.5 days every ten years. The rainfall trends are in accordance with those of shallow landslide events, pointing out the close and direct dependence of the shallow landslide events on the rainfall regime variations. The results obtained were also used to validate the robustness of the performance of the Regional Shallow Landslide Early Warning System adopted in Piemonte over the investigated period, confirming the effectiveness of the trigger thresholds used for the entire historical series and for different geographical areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomorphological Mapping Research for Landslide)
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