Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies

A special issue of Gastronomy (ISSN 2813-513X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 5597

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gastronomic studies and sciences are at a crucial turning point, since food is increasingly becoming the lens through which scholars evaluate and reflect upon the inextricable relationships, changing across space and time, between natural resources and human societies.

Diverse trajectories of agricultural and food sciences, food studies, and dietetics have recently addressed the relevance of the food systems for sustainability and One Health, but transdisciplinary and comprehensive views on culinary science and gastronomy at large are still missing.

This Special Issue would like to fill this gap, and also aims to advocate for a new idea of citizen science that is relationships-based and co-created together with diverse food actors.

The Special Issue will ideally include top-quality research papers and review papers dealing with every aspect of gastronomic sciences and studies.

Prof. Dr. Andrea Pieroni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Gastronomy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • gastronomy
  • food studies
  • culinary sciences
  • food humanities
  • food science

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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20 pages, 2626 KiB  
Article
Peasant Food Provision Strategies and Scientific Proposals for Famine Foods in Eighteenth-Century Sweden
by Ingvar Svanberg and Sabira Ståhlberg
Gastronomy 2024, 2(1), 18-37; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy2010002 - 6 Feb 2024
Viewed by 859
Abstract
The peasant diet during the Little Ice Age in Sweden was mainly grain-based (bread, gruel, and porridge), and the country was heavily dependent on grain imports to meet the population’s needs for food. During the eighteenth century in particular, when famines were frequent [...] Read more.
The peasant diet during the Little Ice Age in Sweden was mainly grain-based (bread, gruel, and porridge), and the country was heavily dependent on grain imports to meet the population’s needs for food. During the eighteenth century in particular, when famines were frequent following failed harvests, Swedish peasants utilized a range of locally available resources to survive. Bark bread made of cambium (phloem) from Pinus sylvestris was, for example, commonly used as famine food. Scientists of the Enlightenment period and the state authorities tried to alleviate hunger and poverty through the introduction of new food resources and cooking techniques, including wild or agricultural plants such as lichens or potato, and the use of protein sources different from the traditional ones, such as horse meat. However, many of these proposals encountered strong resistance from the peasantry, and only at the end of the 1800s famines ceased to cause suffering in Sweden. Scientific studies have so far focused mainly on mortality, malnutrition, demography, and official responses to famines; yet the question of what the starving peasants gathered, prepared, and consumed is important for the understanding of the historical situation. Also, the difference between the scientific proposals and peasants’ decisions and choices must be clearly distinguished. This historical study using an ethnobiological approach discusses peasant subsistence strategies in Sweden in the eighteenth century using contemporary sources, which provide an opportunity to study how the population obtained foodstuffs, adapted their diet to available ingredients, and the interaction and conflicting views of peasants and scientists about new, science-based nutrition proposals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
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17 pages, 819 KiB  
Article
Ready for the «Check-In» of Local Products on Hotel Menus?
by Charisia Vlachou, Ourania Koukousolatou and Nikoletta Theofania Siamagka
Gastronomy 2024, 2(1), 1-17; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy2010001 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1147
Abstract
The link between tourism and the agricultural sector offers, on the one hand, authentic cultural experiences to tourists and, on the other hand, a competitive advantage to tourism businesses seeking to differentiate themselves. This research attempts to empirically investigate the organizational readiness, perceived [...] Read more.
The link between tourism and the agricultural sector offers, on the one hand, authentic cultural experiences to tourists and, on the other hand, a competitive advantage to tourism businesses seeking to differentiate themselves. This research attempts to empirically investigate the organizational readiness, perceived benefits, and intention of hotels to include local agri-food products in their menus. The data collection was carried out through a questionnaire using a five-point Likert scale and the readiness was evaluated in terms of its three dimensions (organizational culture, organizational climate, and organizational capacity), as well as the perceived benefits in one hundred and twelve hotels of the Regional Unit of Kavala and Thassos in Greece. Following a cluster analysis, three categories of hotels emerged, namely, “Committed”, “Hesitant”, and “Indifferent”. This article uses elements of organizational theory in the hotel industry for the inclusion of local agri-food products in hotel menus, complementing the existing limited literature. The research also has important managerial implications and can be used for policymaking by stakeholders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
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13 pages, 963 KiB  
Article
Kelp Wanted?! Understanding the Drivers of US Consumers’ Willingness to Buy and Their Willingness to Pay a Price Premium for Sea Vegetables
by Meike Rombach, Julio Botero and David L. Dean
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 44-56; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010005 - 5 Dec 2023
Viewed by 897
Abstract
Lifestyle changes towards sustainable and healthy diets have given rise to superfoods. Sea vegetables, which are otherwise known as edible seaweeds fall in the category of superfoods and are perceived as sustainable and ethical food options. The present study is dedicated to US [...] Read more.
Lifestyle changes towards sustainable and healthy diets have given rise to superfoods. Sea vegetables, which are otherwise known as edible seaweeds fall in the category of superfoods and are perceived as sustainable and ethical food options. The present study is dedicated to US consumers’ willingness to buy and their willingness to pay a price premium for sea vegetables, providing insights and best-practice recommendations for marketing managers in the US food retail and gastronomy. An online consumer survey was distributed to explore predictors explaining willingness to buy and pay a price premium. Food engagement, food attributes, consumer knowledge, and health importance were the investigated predictors covered in the survey. Descriptive statistics and partial least square structural equation modelling were used to analyze the data. Food engagement and sea vegetable intrinsic and extrinsic attributes were identified as the strongest predictors for both willingness to buy and to pay a price premium. In contrast, health importance only influenced willingness to buy, and consumer knowledge only influenced willingness to pay a price premium. By focusing on the forms of consumer behavior with high commitment and exploring and validating the factors driving these consumers’ behaviors, the study fills an important research gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
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14 pages, 285 KiB  
Essay
Politics beyond the Plate: Embracing Transdisciplinarity in Addressing the Gastronomic Heritage of Spain
by Fabio Parasecoli and Gloria Rodriguez-Garcia
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 18-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010003 - 7 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1932
Abstract
Research and initiatives in the emerging field of gastronomy require collaboration among scholars and experts from diverse backgrounds. Transdisciplinarity has been indicated as an effective approach allowing stakeholders from a variety of disciplines and professional practices to better understand and plan interventions in [...] Read more.
Research and initiatives in the emerging field of gastronomy require collaboration among scholars and experts from diverse backgrounds. Transdisciplinarity has been indicated as an effective approach allowing stakeholders from a variety of disciplines and professional practices to better understand and plan interventions in complex gastronomy-related issues and challenges. However, the actors collaborating in such transdisciplinary processes often represent different priorities, values, and needs, as well as varying levels of power and access to financial means. This is particularly evident when it comes to gastronomic heritage. Its identification, support, and promotion require cultural, social, and political negotiations among a great number of stakeholders. Using a pilot workshop organized in March 2023 in Madrid as a case study, this articles suggests that participatory design methods can offer instruments to ensure the effective transdisciplinarity required in gastronomy and to address the political tensions that underlie many of its aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
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