Computational Advances in Aerospace Engineering: Modeling, Simulation and Aerospace Systems Testing

A special issue of Computation (ISSN 2079-3197). This special issue belongs to the section "Computational Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 3461

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Space Engineering, Samara National Research University, Samara 443086, Russia
Interests: aerospace engineering; applied mechanics; heat transfer; modeling and simulation; signal processing; dynamics of spacecraft; testing of aerospace systems
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Computation and computational experimentation are a powerful tool used to obtain new knowledge, test assumptions and hypotheses, and study various phenomena and processes in detail. In some fields, this tool has already become unique and irreplaceable. One of these areas is Aerospace Engineering. Costly and sometimes difficult to reproduce in situ experiments are increasingly being replaced or supplemented by computational experiments. This Special Issue is designed to bring together cutting-edge researchers from around the world and the latest advances in Modeling, Simulation, and Aerospace Systems Testing. This Special Issue will provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge and latest experiences in Aerospace Engineering. Results related to artificial intelligence and fuzzy logic are also welcome. As a Guest Editor, I look forward to receiving interesting contributions from outstanding researchers in the field. The topics include:

  • Aerospace Engineering;
  • Modeling, Simulation in Aerospace Engineering and Aerospace Systems;
  • Aerospace Systems Testing;
  • Artificial Intelligence in Aerospace Engineering and Aerospace Systems;
  • Control Systems and Algorithms for Aerospace Systems;
  • The description and Modeling of Experiments onboard Aerospace Systems;
  • Processing of measurement results onboard aerospace systems;
  • The modeling of Controlled and Uncontrolled Motion of Aerospace Systems and other topics.

Prof. Dr. Andry Sedelnikov
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Computation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aerospace engineering
  • modeling, simulation
  • aerospace systems
  • artificial intelligence
  • control systems and algorithms
  • processing of measurement results
  • motion of aerospace systems

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

26 pages, 11579 KiB  
Article
Algorithm for Propeller Optimization Based on Differential Evolution
by Andry Sedelnikov, Evgenii Kurkin, Jose Gabriel Quijada-Pioquinto, Oleg Lukyanov, Dmitrii Nazarov, Vladislava Chertykovtseva, Ekaterina Kurkina and Van Hung Hoang
Computation 2024, 12(3), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/computation12030052 - 06 Mar 2024
Viewed by 967
Abstract
This paper describes the development of a methodology for air propeller optimization using Bezier curves to describe blade geometry. The proposed approach allows for more flexibility in setting the propeller shape, for example, using a variable airfoil over the blade span. The goal [...] Read more.
This paper describes the development of a methodology for air propeller optimization using Bezier curves to describe blade geometry. The proposed approach allows for more flexibility in setting the propeller shape, for example, using a variable airfoil over the blade span. The goal of optimization is to identify the appropriate geometry of a propeller that reduces the power required to achieve a given thrust. Because the proposed optimization problem is a constrained optimization process, the technique of generating a penalty function was used to convert the process into a nonconstrained optimization. For the optimization process, a variant of the differential evolution algorithm was used, which includes adaptive techniques of the evolutionary operators and a population size reduction method. The aerodynamic characteristics of the propellers were obtained using the similar to blade element momentum theory (BEMT) isolated section method (ISM) and the XFOIL program. Replacing the angle of geometric twist with the angle of attack of the airfoil section as a design variable made it possible to increase the robustness of the optimization algorithm and reduce the calculation time. The optimization technique was implemented in the OpenVINT code and has been used to design helicopter and tractor propellers for unmanned aerial vehicles. The development algorithm was validated experimentally and using CFD numerical method. The experimental tests confirm that the optimized propeller geometry is superior to commercial analogues available on the market. Full article
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29 pages, 10558 KiB  
Article
Topology Optimization and Efficiency Evaluation of Short-Fiber-Reinforced Composite Structures Considering Anisotropy
by Evgenii Kurkin, Oscar Ulises Espinosa Barcenas, Evgenii Kishov and Oleg Lukyanov
Computation 2024, 12(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/computation12020035 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1476
Abstract
The current study aims to develop a methodology for obtaining topology-optimal structures made of short fiber-reinforced polymers. Each iteration of topology optimization involves two consecutive steps: the first is a simulation of the injection molding process for obtaining the fiber orientation tensor, and [...] Read more.
The current study aims to develop a methodology for obtaining topology-optimal structures made of short fiber-reinforced polymers. Each iteration of topology optimization involves two consecutive steps: the first is a simulation of the injection molding process for obtaining the fiber orientation tensor, and the second is a structural analysis with anisotropic material properties. Accounting for the molding process during the internal iterations of topology optimization makes it possible to enhance the weight efficiency of structures—a crucial aspect, especially in aerospace. Anisotropy is considered through the fiber orientation tensor, which is modeled by solving the plastic molding equations for non-Newtonian fluids and then introduced as a variable in the stiffness matrix during the structural analysis. Structural analysis using a linear anisotropic material model was employed within the topology optimization. For verification, a non-linear elasto-plastic material model was used based on an exponential-and-linear hardening law. The evaluation of weight efficiency in structures composed of short-reinforced composite materials using a dimensionless criterion is addressed. Experimental verification was performed to confirm the validity of the developed methodology. The evidence illustrates that considering anisotropy leads to stiffer structures, and structural elements should be oriented in the direction of maximal stiffness. The load-carrying factor is expressed in terms of failure criteria. The presented multidisciplinary methodology can be used to improve the quality of the design of structures made of short fiber-reinforced composites (SFRC), where high stiffness, high strength, and minimum mass are the primary required structural characteristics. Full article
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