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Role of Occupational Footwear and Prolonged Walking on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation during Maximal Exertions and Postural Stability Tasks

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Neuromechanics Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
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Human Factors & Athlete Engineering, Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS), Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39759, USA
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Department of Industrial Systems and Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 39762, USA
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Department of Industrial Systems and Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849, USA
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Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion, Troy University, Troy, AL 36082, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul Comfort
Biomechanics 2021, 1(2), 202-213; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics1020017
Received: 11 May 2021 / Revised: 23 July 2021 / Accepted: 26 July 2021 / Published: 30 July 2021
Background: Occupational footwear and a prolonged duration of walking have been previously reported to play a role in maintaining postural stability. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the impact of three types of occupational footwear: the steel-toed work boot (ST), the tactical work boot (TB), and the low-top work shoe (LT) on previously unreported lower extremity muscle activity during postural stability tasks. Methods: Electromyography (EMG) muscle activity was measured from four lower extremity muscles (vastus medialis (VM), medial hamstrings (MH), tibialis anterior (TA), and medial gastrocnemius (MG) during maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) and during a sensory organization test (SOT) every 30 min over a 4 h simulated workload while wearing ST, TB, and LT footwear. The mean MVIC and the mean and percentage MVIC during each SOT condition from each muscle was analyzed individually using a repeated measures ANOVA at an alpha level of 0.05. Results: Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found for maximal exertions, but this was limited to only the time main effect. No significant differences existed for EMG measures during the SOT. Conclusion: The findings suggest that occupational footwear type does not influence lower extremity muscle activity during both MVIC and SOT. Significantly lower muscle activity during maximal exertions over the course of the 4 h workload was evident, which can be attributed to localized muscular fatigue, but this was not sufficient to impact muscle activity during postural stability tasks. View Full-Text
Keywords: postural stability; ergonomics; work boots; muscle activity postural stability; ergonomics; work boots; muscle activity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chander, H.; Kodithuwakku Arachchige, S.N.K.; Turner, A.J.; Burch V, R.F.; Knight, A.C.; Wade, C.; Garner, J.C. Role of Occupational Footwear and Prolonged Walking on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation during Maximal Exertions and Postural Stability Tasks. Biomechanics 2021, 1, 202-213. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics1020017

AMA Style

Chander H, Kodithuwakku Arachchige SNK, Turner AJ, Burch V RF, Knight AC, Wade C, Garner JC. Role of Occupational Footwear and Prolonged Walking on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation during Maximal Exertions and Postural Stability Tasks. Biomechanics. 2021; 1(2):202-213. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics1020017

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chander, Harish, Sachini N.K. Kodithuwakku Arachchige, Alana J. Turner, Reuben F. Burch V, Adam C. Knight, Chip Wade, and John C. Garner. 2021. "Role of Occupational Footwear and Prolonged Walking on Lower Extremity Muscle Activation during Maximal Exertions and Postural Stability Tasks" Biomechanics 1, no. 2: 202-213. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomechanics1020017

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