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Article

The Normative World of Memes: Political Communication Strategies in the United States and Ecuador

Communication Observatory (OdeCom), Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Quito 170143, Ecuador
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Academic Editor: Andreu Casero-Ripollés
Journal. Media. 2022, 3(1), 40-51; https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia3010004
Received: 15 September 2021 / Revised: 2 December 2021 / Accepted: 23 December 2021 / Published: 6 January 2022
The media convergence model presents an environment in which everyone produces information without intermediates or filters. A subsequent insight shows that users (prosumers) —gathered in networked communities—also shape messages’ flow. Social media play a substantial role. This information is loaded with public values and ideologies that shape a normative world: social media has become a fundamental platform where users interact and promote public values. Memetics facilitates this phenomenon. Memes have three main characteristics: (1) Diffuse at the micro-level but shape the macrostructure of society; (2) Are based on popular culture; (3) Travel through competition and selection. In this context, this paper examineshow citizens from Ecuador and the United States reappropriate memes during a public discussion? The investigation is based on multimodal analysis and compares the most popular memes among the United States and Ecuador produced during the candidate debate (Trump vs. Biden [2020] and Lasso vs. Arauz [2021]). The findings suggest that, during a public discussion, it is common to use humor based on popular culture to question authority. Furthermore, a message becomes a meme when it evidences the gap between reality and expectations (normativity). Normativity depends on the context: Americans complain about the expectations of a debate; Ecuadorians, about discourtesy and violence. View Full-Text
Keywords: political communication; memes; social networks political communication; memes; social networks
MDPI and ACS Style

López-Paredes, M.; Carrillo-Andrade, A. The Normative World of Memes: Political Communication Strategies in the United States and Ecuador. Journal. Media. 2022, 3, 40-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia3010004

AMA Style

López-Paredes M, Carrillo-Andrade A. The Normative World of Memes: Political Communication Strategies in the United States and Ecuador. Journalism and Media. 2022; 3(1):40-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia3010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

López-Paredes, Marco, and Andrea Carrillo-Andrade. 2022. "The Normative World of Memes: Political Communication Strategies in the United States and Ecuador" Journalism and Media 3, no. 1: 40-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/journalmedia3010004

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