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What Can Native Trees Provide in Revegetating Tropical Degraded Land? An Experience of Man-Made Dipterocarp Forest in Indonesia

1
Forest Research and Development Center—Indonesia Ministry of Environment and Forestry, 16118 Bogor, Indonesia
2
Research Centre for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Sciences, 16911 Bogor, Indonesia
3
Department of Silviculture, Faculty of Forestry—Universitas Sumatera Utara, 20155 Medan, Indonesia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at the 1st International Electronic Conference on Forests—Forests for a Better Future: Sustainability, Innovation, Interdisciplinarity, 15–30 November 2020; Available online: https://iecf2020.sciforum.net.
Environ. Sci. Proc. 2021, 3(1), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/IECF2020-08069
Published: 13 November 2020
The benefits of revegetation provided by the successful growth of planted vegetations. This paper described a successful initiative on the revegetation of tropical degraded land using native trees. More than 250 hectares of intact landscape in Gunung Dahu, West Java—Indonesia have been successfully revegetated using 32 Dipterocarp species. The success of this 20-years-old revegetated landscape was revealed by timber volume, natural regeneration, soil characteristics, ectomycorrhiza occurrence, and ecotourism potential. The results showed that the average diameter and height were varied from 12–43 cm and 10–23 m; diameter mean annual increment were at 0.6–2.1 cm year1; standing stock per hectares were at 10–220.84 m3 ha−1. The variations might be caused by different planted species, spacing distance, and planting technique. The natural regeneration success was observed by the offspring’s occurrence from six Shorea species and supported by mycorrhiza fruiting bodies predominantly by the genus Rusula. Planted trees also improved the availability of organic materials to the soils, as described by the good total soil porosity (51.06–52.32%) and infiltration rate (120–15,533 mm hour−1) at the site. The landscape also provided springs with continuous water supply and allowed tourists to experience the serenity of the tropical forest. Hence, revegetation using a native tree is prospective and proven to deliver a wider benefit in the ecological, economic, and social aspect.
Keywords: landscape restoration; indigenous tree; Shorea; standing stock landscape restoration; indigenous tree; Shorea; standing stock
MDPI and ACS Style

Rachmat, H.H.; Ginoga, K.L.; Lisnawati, Y.; Hidayat, A.; Fambayun, R.A.; Yulita, K.S.; Susilowati, A. What Can Native Trees Provide in Revegetating Tropical Degraded Land? An Experience of Man-Made Dipterocarp Forest in Indonesia. Environ. Sci. Proc. 2021, 3, 79. https://doi.org/10.3390/IECF2020-08069

AMA Style

Rachmat HH, Ginoga KL, Lisnawati Y, Hidayat A, Fambayun RA, Yulita KS, Susilowati A. What Can Native Trees Provide in Revegetating Tropical Degraded Land? An Experience of Man-Made Dipterocarp Forest in Indonesia. Environmental Sciences Proceedings. 2021; 3(1):79. https://doi.org/10.3390/IECF2020-08069

Chicago/Turabian Style

Rachmat, Henti Hendalastuti, Kirsfianti Linda Ginoga, Yunita Lisnawati, Asep Hidayat, Rizki Ary Fambayun, Kusumadewi Sri Yulita, and Arida Susilowati. 2021. "What Can Native Trees Provide in Revegetating Tropical Degraded Land? An Experience of Man-Made Dipterocarp Forest in Indonesia" Environmental Sciences Proceedings 3, no. 1: 79. https://doi.org/10.3390/IECF2020-08069

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