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Blockade of Catecholamine Reuptake in the Prelimbic Cortex Decreases Top-Down Attentional Control in Response to Novel, but not Familiar Appetitive Distracters, within a Timing Paradigm

Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, USTAR BioInnovations Center, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA
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NeuroSci 2020, 1(2), 99-114; https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci1020010
Received: 27 September 2020 / Revised: 2 November 2020 / Accepted: 4 December 2020 / Published: 8 December 2020
Emotionally charged distracters delay timing behavior. Increasing catecholamine levels within the prelimbic cortex has beneficial effects on timing by decreasing the delay after aversive distracters. Here we examined whether increasing catecholamine levels within the prelimbic cortex also protects against the deleterious timing delays caused by novel distracters or by familiar appetitive distracters. Rats were trained in a peak-interval procedure and tested in trials with either a novel (unreinforced) distracter, a familiar appetitive (food-reinforced) distracter, or no distracter after being locally infused with catecholamine reuptake blocker nomifensine within the prelimbic cortex. Prelimbic infusion of nomifensine did not alter timing accuracy and precision. However, it increased the delay caused by novel distracters in an inverted-U dose-dependent manner, while being ineffective for appetitive distracters. Together with previous data, these results suggest that catecholaminergic modulation of prelimbic top-down attentional control of interval timing varies with distracter’s valence: prelimbic catecholamines increase attentional control when presented with familiar aversive distracters, have no effect on familiar neutral or familiar appetitive distracters, and decrease it when presented with novel distracters. These findings detail complex interactions between catecholaminergic modulation of attention to timing and nontemporal properties of stimuli, which should be considered when developing therapeutic methods for attentional or affective disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: peak-interval; timing; nomifensine; prelimbic cortex; attention; catecholamine peak-interval; timing; nomifensine; prelimbic cortex; attention; catecholamine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Matthews, A.R.; Buhusi, M.; Buhusi, C.V. Blockade of Catecholamine Reuptake in the Prelimbic Cortex Decreases Top-Down Attentional Control in Response to Novel, but not Familiar Appetitive Distracters, within a Timing Paradigm. NeuroSci 2020, 1, 99-114. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci1020010

AMA Style

Matthews AR, Buhusi M, Buhusi CV. Blockade of Catecholamine Reuptake in the Prelimbic Cortex Decreases Top-Down Attentional Control in Response to Novel, but not Familiar Appetitive Distracters, within a Timing Paradigm. NeuroSci. 2020; 1(2):99-114. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci1020010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Matthews, Alexander R.; Buhusi, Mona; Buhusi, Catalin V. 2020. "Blockade of Catecholamine Reuptake in the Prelimbic Cortex Decreases Top-Down Attentional Control in Response to Novel, but not Familiar Appetitive Distracters, within a Timing Paradigm" NeuroSci 1, no. 2: 99-114. https://doi.org/10.3390/neurosci1020010

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