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Article

An Experimental Approach to Assessing the Roles of Magnesium, Calcium, and Carbonate Ratios in Marine Carbonates

Leibniz Center for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT), Fahrenheitstr. 6, 28359 Bremen, Germany
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Academic Editor: Peter Schupp
Oceans 2021, 2(1), 193-214; https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans2010012
Received: 30 August 2020 / Revised: 18 February 2021 / Accepted: 22 February 2021 / Published: 3 March 2021
Marine biomineralization is a globally important biological and geochemical process. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the precipitation of calcium carbonate [CaCO3] within the calcifying fluid of marine organisms, such as corals, crustose coralline algae, and foraminifera, presents one of the most elusive, yet relevant areas of biomineralization research, due to the often-impenetrable ability to measure the process in situ. The precipitation of CaCO3 is assumed to be largely controlled by the saturation state [Ω] of the extracellular calcifying fluid. In this study, we mimicked the typical pH and Ω known for the calcifying fluid in corals, while varying the magnesium, calcium, and carbonate concentrations in six chemo-static growth experiments, thereby mimicking various dissolved inorganic carbon concentration mechanisms and ionic movement into the extracellular calcifying fluid. Reduced mineralization and varied CaCO3 morphologies highlight the inhibiting effect of magnesium regardless of pH and Ω and suggests the importance of strong magnesium removal or calcium concentration mechanisms. In respect to ocean acidification studies, this could allow an explanation for why specific marine calcifiers respond differently to lower saturation states. View Full-Text
Keywords: marine biomineralization; inorganic mineralization; coral reefs; ocean acidification (OA); omega; dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC); extracellular calcifying fluid (ECF) marine biomineralization; inorganic mineralization; coral reefs; ocean acidification (OA); omega; dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC); extracellular calcifying fluid (ECF)
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MDPI and ACS Style

Reymond, C.E.; Hohn, S. An Experimental Approach to Assessing the Roles of Magnesium, Calcium, and Carbonate Ratios in Marine Carbonates. Oceans 2021, 2, 193-214. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans2010012

AMA Style

Reymond CE, Hohn S. An Experimental Approach to Assessing the Roles of Magnesium, Calcium, and Carbonate Ratios in Marine Carbonates. Oceans. 2021; 2(1):193-214. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans2010012

Chicago/Turabian Style

Reymond, Claire E., and Sönke Hohn. 2021. "An Experimental Approach to Assessing the Roles of Magnesium, Calcium, and Carbonate Ratios in Marine Carbonates" Oceans 2, no. 1: 193-214. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans2010012

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