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Article

Effect of Acute Seawater Temperature Increase on the Survival of a Fish Ectoparasite

1
Institute of Environmental and Marine Sciences, Silliman University, 6200 Dumaguete City, Negros Oriental, Philippines
2
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia QLD 4072, Australia
3
ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville QLD 4811, Australia
4
Department of Biological Sciences and Environmental Sciences Program, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR 72467, USA
5
Water Research Group, Unit for Environmental Science and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Oceans 2020, 1(4), 215-236; https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans1040016
Received: 17 July 2020 / Revised: 25 September 2020 / Accepted: 27 September 2020 / Published: 4 October 2020
Extreme warming events that contribute to mass coral bleaching are occurring with increasing regularity, raising questions about their effect on coral reef ecological interactions. However, the effects of such events on parasite-host interactions are largely ignored. Gnathiid isopods are common, highly mobile, external parasites of coral reef fishes, that feed on blood during the juvenile stage. They have direct and indirect impacts on their fish hosts, and are the major food source for cleaner fishes. However, how these interactions might be impacted by increased temperatures is unknown. We examined the effects of acute temperature increases, similar to those observed during mass bleaching events, on survivorship of gnathiid isopod juveniles. Laboratory experiments were conducted using individuals from one species (Gnathia aureamaculosa) from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), and multiple unknown species from the central Philippines. Fed and unfed GBR gnathiids were held in temperature treatments of 29 °C to 32 °C and fed Philippines gnathiids were held at 28 °C to 36 °C. Gnathiids from both locations showed rapid mortality when held in temperatures 2 °C to 3 °C above average seasonal sea surface temperature (32 °C). This suggests environmental changes in temperature can influence gnathiid survival, which could have significant ecological consequences for host-parasite-cleaner fish interactions during increased temperature events. View Full-Text
Keywords: Gnathiidae; Isopoda; coral reefs; climate change; ocean warming; coral bleaching; Great Barrier Reef; Coral Triangle Gnathiidae; Isopoda; coral reefs; climate change; ocean warming; coral bleaching; Great Barrier Reef; Coral Triangle
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MDPI and ACS Style

Shodipo, M.O.; Duong, B.; Graba-Landry, A.; Grutter, A.S.; Sikkel, P.C. Effect of Acute Seawater Temperature Increase on the Survival of a Fish Ectoparasite. Oceans 2020, 1, 215-236. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans1040016

AMA Style

Shodipo MO, Duong B, Graba-Landry A, Grutter AS, Sikkel PC. Effect of Acute Seawater Temperature Increase on the Survival of a Fish Ectoparasite. Oceans. 2020; 1(4):215-236. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans1040016

Chicago/Turabian Style

Shodipo, Mary O., Berilin Duong, Alexia Graba-Landry, Alexandra S. Grutter, and Paul C. Sikkel 2020. "Effect of Acute Seawater Temperature Increase on the Survival of a Fish Ectoparasite" Oceans 1, no. 4: 215-236. https://doi.org/10.3390/oceans1040016

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