Next Article in Journal
Looking East for Mindfulness: A Glimpse of Practices and Research on Shaolin Martial Arts and Related Practices to Advance Sport Psychology
Next Article in Special Issue
A Meta-Analysis of Spearman’s Hypothesis Tested on Latin-American Hispanics, Including a New Way to Correct for Imperfectly Measuring the Construct of g
Previous Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Effect of Biracial Status and Color on Crystallized Intelligence in the U.S.-Born African–European American Population
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Evidence for Recent Polygenic Selection on Educational Attainment and Intelligence Inferred from Gwas Hits: A Replication of Previous Findings Using Recent Data

Department of Biology, Tuebingen University, 72074 Tuebingen, Germany
Psych 2019, 1(1), 55-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010005
Received: 22 February 2019 / Revised: 23 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 28 March 2019
  |  
PDF [527 KB, uploaded 28 March 2019]
  |     |  

Abstract

Genetic variants identified by three large genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of educational attainment (EA) were used to test a polygenic selection model. Weighted and unweighted polygenic scores (PGS) were calculated and compared across populations using data from the 1000 Genomes (n = 26), HGDP-CEPH (n = 52) and gnomAD (n = 8) datasets. The PGS from the largest EA GWAS was highly correlated to two previously published PGSs (r = 0.96–0.97, N = 26). These factors are both highly predictive of average population IQ (r = 0.9, N = 23) and Learning index (r = 0.8, N = 22) and are robust to tests of spatial autocorrelation. Monte Carlo simulations yielded highly significant p values. In the gnomAD samples, the correlation between PGS and IQ was almost perfect (r = 0.98, N = 8), and ANOVA showed significant population differences in allele frequencies with positive effect. Socioeconomic variables slightly improved the prediction accuracy of the model (from 78–80% to 85–89%), but the PGS explained twice as much of the variance in IQ compared to socioeconomic variables. In both 1000 Genomes and gnomAD, there was a weak trend for lower GWAS significance SNPs to be less predictive of population IQ. Additionally, a subset of SNPs were found in the HGDP-CEPH sample (N = 127). The analysis of this sample yielded a positive correlation with latitude and a low negative correlation with distance from East Africa. This study provides robust results after accounting for spatial autocorrelation with Fst distances and random noise via an empirical Monte Carlo simulation using null SNPs. View Full-Text
Keywords: educational attainment; polygenes; polygenic selection; IQ; GWAS educational attainment; polygenes; polygenic selection; IQ; GWAS
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Piffer, D. Evidence for Recent Polygenic Selection on Educational Attainment and Intelligence Inferred from Gwas Hits: A Replication of Previous Findings Using Recent Data. Psych 2019, 1, 55-75.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Psych EISSN 2624-8611 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top