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Open AccessArticle

Polypharmacy and Depressive Symptoms in U.S.-Born Mexican American Older Adults

1
Department of Family Medicine, Charles R Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
2
Department of Pharmacy Practice, West Coast University School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA 91606, USA
3
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
4
School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
5
Department of Family Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Psych 2019, 1(1), 491-503; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010038
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 29 October 2019 / Accepted: 30 October 2019 / Published: 1 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
Background: Although some studies have suggested a link between polypharmacy and poor mental health, less is known about the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptomology among U.S.-born older Mexican Americans. Aim: This study aimed to test the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms in U.S.-born older Latino Americans. Materials and methods: Data came from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA 2008). A total of 691 U.S.-born older (age >= 65) Mexican Americans entered this analysis. Polypharmacy was the independent variable. Level of depressive symptoms was the outcome. Age, gender, socioeconomic status (education, income, and employment), retirement status, health (chronic medical conditions, self-rated health, and activities of daily living), language, acculturation, and smoking were the covariates. A linear regression model was used to analyze the data. Results: We found a positive association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms, which was above and beyond demographic factors, socioeconomic status, physical health, health behaviors, language, acculturation, and health insurance. Conclusion: Polypharmacy is linked to depressive symptoms in U.S.-born older Mexican Americans. More research is needed to test the effects of reducing inappropriate polypharmacy on mental well-being of first and second generation older Mexican Americans. There is also a need to study the role of drug-drug interaction in explaining the observed link between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms. View Full-Text
Keywords: Mexican Americans; ethnicity; Hispanics; Latino; ethnic groups; polypharmacy; depressive symptoms Mexican Americans; ethnicity; Hispanics; Latino; ethnic groups; polypharmacy; depressive symptoms
MDPI and ACS Style

Assari, S.; Wisseh, C.; Saqib, M.; Helmi, H.; Bazargan, M. Polypharmacy and Depressive Symptoms in U.S.-Born Mexican American Older Adults. Psych 2019, 1, 491-503.

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