Special Issue "Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry"

A special issue of Psych (ISSN 2624-8611).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mosad Zineldin
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health and Life Sciences-Department of Medicine and Optometry-e.Health institution, Linnaeus University, SE-35195 Växjö, Sweden
Interests: medical science; psychology; social work; social psychology; sociology; caring science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Advances in Health, Social Psychology, and Psychiatry is intended to provide a medium for the prompt publication of scientific contributions concerned with all aspects of the epidemiology of physiological and psychiatric disorders—social structure and mental health, biological and genetic. In addition, this Special Issue has a particular focus on the effects of social conditions upon behaviour and the relationship between psychiatric disorders and the social environment.
This Special Issue is thus devoted to the application of medical and health theories and research from social psychology and psychiatry toward a better understanding of the human brain and its adaptation and adjustment, including both the alleviation of psychological and psychiatry problems and distress (e.g., psychopathology).
Topics of interest include (but are not limited to) traditionally defined psychopathology (e.g., depression), emotional and behavioral problems and disorders in living (e.g., conflicts and failure of close relationships), the enhancement of subjective well-being (social and psychological considerations and seizure disorders are examples). and the processes of psychological change in everyday life (e.g., self-regulation) and professional settings (e.g., psychotherapy and counseling).
Articles reporting the results of theory-driven empirical research are given priority, but theoretical articles, review articles, clinical case studies, and essays on professional issues are also welcome. Articles describing the development of new scales (personality or otherwise) or the revision of existing scales are not appropriate for this journal.
Contributions may be of a clinical nature provided they relate to social issues, or they may deal with specialised investigations in the fields of social psychology and psychiatry, sociology, epidemiology, medical and health service research, and public mental health. We will publish papers on cross-cultural and trans-cultural themes.

Prof. Dr. Mosad Zineldin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Psych is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Gender Difference in Social Capital, Common Mental Disorders and Depression: ELSA-Brasil Study
Psych 2020, 2(1), 85-96; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2010009 - 13 Mar 2020
Abstract
Association studies between social capital and health point out that a high level of social capital can act as a protector for mental health. The growing interest in social risk factors for mental health coincides with the development of social capital research. Higher [...] Read more.
Association studies between social capital and health point out that a high level of social capital can act as a protector for mental health. The growing interest in social risk factors for mental health coincides with the development of social capital research. Higher levels of social capital available through social networks can act as a protector for mental health. This study investigates gender differences in the association between social capital and common mental disorders (CMD) and depression. We analyzed 15,052 participants in the baseline of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). CMD and depression were assessed by Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) and social capital by the Resource Generator scale. We used Logistic regression models stratified by sex. Women with lower social capital in the social support dimension had a greater chance of presenting CMD (OR = 1.36; CI 95%: 1.16–1.60) and depression (OR = 2.07; CI 95%: 1.57–2.72) when compared to women with higher social capital. No association was identified among men, or among women in the “prestige and education” dimension. The differences found between the dimensions of social capital support its multidimensionality, as well as the differences found between sexes, confirm the need to approach gender in its association with mental health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
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Open AccessArticle
A Relational Model for Stress: A Systematic Review of the Risk and Protective Factors for Stress-Related Diseases in Firefighters
Psych 2020, 2(1), 74-84; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2010008 - 28 Feb 2020
Abstract
Firefighters are considered a high-risk group for the development of PTSD and other stress-related diseases. More than the exposure to potentially traumatic events, personal and occupational characteristics have been pointed out as interfering in the perception of stress, which may lead to the [...] Read more.
Firefighters are considered a high-risk group for the development of PTSD and other stress-related diseases. More than the exposure to potentially traumatic events, personal and occupational characteristics have been pointed out as interfering in the perception of stress, which may lead to the emergence of mental and physical symptoms. This study aimed to analyze the relationship between the main factors that contribute to stress-related diseases in firefighters. A systematic review was conducted in order to identify original articles focusing on risk and protective factors for stress in this population. Personality traits, training, experience in extreme situations and social and organizational support influence the perception of stress and, consequently, the choice of coping strategies, which may protect against or potentiate the stress reactions. The findings of this study allow us to draw a relational model that represents the dynamics among the factors related to stress in firefighters. The development of PTSD and other stress-related diseases depends on a host of pre-trauma and post-trauma factors and, although training is an important protective factor, being prepared to face extreme situations does not mean being immune to traumatic stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
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Open AccessArticle
Self-Reported Food Insecurity and Depression among the Older Population in South Africa
Psych 2020, 2(1), 34-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2010004 - 27 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
South Africa represents one of the most rapidly aging countries in sub-Saharan Africa with a rising burden of age-related psychological morbidities. Despite having one of the highest human development scores in the region, the country faces serious poverty and food insecurity related challenges. [...] Read more.
South Africa represents one of the most rapidly aging countries in sub-Saharan Africa with a rising burden of age-related psychological morbidities. Despite having one of the highest human development scores in the region, the country faces serious poverty and food insecurity related challenges. Previous studies have shown a positive association between food insecurity and poor mental health among the adult population, however there is no systematic evidence on this association among the elderly population in an African setting. In the present study, we aimed to address this research gap by analyzing cross-sectional data (n = 931) on the over-50 population (>50 years) from the SAGE (Study on global AGEing and adult health) Well-Being of Older People Study (WOPS) of the World Health Organization, conducted between 2010 and 2013. The outcome variable was perceived depression and the explanatory variables included several sociodemographic factors including self-reported food insecurity. The independent associations between the outcome and explanatory variables were measured using multivariable regression analysis. Results showed that close to a quarter of the population (22.6%, 95% CI = 21.4, 24.7) reported having depression in the last 12 months, with the percentage being markedly higher among women (71.4%). In the multivariable regression analysis, self-reported food insecurity was found to be the strongest predictor of depression among both sexes. For instance, severe food insecurity increased the odds of depression by 4.805 [3.325, 7.911] times among men and by 4.115 [2.030, 8.341] times among women. Based on the present findings, it is suggested that national food security programs focus on promoting food security among the elderly population in an effort to improve their mental health status. Nonetheless, the data were cross-sectional and the associations can’t imply causality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
Open AccessArticle
Dietary Patterns and Depression: First Results in a Cross-Sectional Study from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)
Psych 2020, 2(1), 11-24; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2010002 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Background: Relations between diet and mental health continue to be a subject for controversy and an increasing numbers of studies. Recent literature is represented by papers that examine overall diet by way of dietary patterns and its association with depression, replacing previous studies [...] Read more.
Background: Relations between diet and mental health continue to be a subject for controversy and an increasing numbers of studies. Recent literature is represented by papers that examine overall diet by way of dietary patterns and its association with depression, replacing previous studies about nutrients. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to evaluate the relation between dietary patterns and depressive episode in the baseline (2008–2010) population of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil). We analyzed 14,798 participants of ELSA-Brasil. Methods: We constructed dietary patterns based on the Food Frequency Questionnaire using multiple correspondence and cluster analysis; to evaluate depressive episodes, we used the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R). As an independent variable, we used the patterns: Traditional, Low-Sugar/Low-Fat, Fruit-Vegetables, and Bakery Products. We used multiple logistic regression models to evaluate relations between the dietary patterns and depressive episodes. Results: The Traditional pattern showed the highest percentages of consumption. After adjusting, the Bakery Products (OR = 1.33; 95%CI 1.05–1.70) was associated positively and significantly with depressive episodes only for women. Conclusions: International studies corroborated this finding, suggesting that the Bakery Products pattern could be a marker of a specific population group in which depressive episodes are frequent. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
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Open AccessArticle
Intelligence, Income and Their Relation to Nutrition
Psych 2020, 2(1), 1-10; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych2010001 - 20 Dec 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intelligence and income on nutrition in Brazil, by means of large-scale secondary data. The cognitive abilities of students were used as a measure of intelligence. In order to evaluate the nutritional quality [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intelligence and income on nutrition in Brazil, by means of large-scale secondary data. The cognitive abilities of students were used as a measure of intelligence. In order to evaluate the nutritional quality of the population, the state hunger and undernutrition index (SHUI) was created. The intelligence explained 34% of the SHUI variation in the country. The development of the population’s intelligence influences the decrease in the rates of hunger and undernutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
Open AccessArticle
Polypharmacy and Depressive Symptoms in U.S.-Born Mexican American Older Adults
Psych 2019, 1(1), 491-503; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010038 - 01 Nov 2019
Abstract
Background: Although some studies have suggested a link between polypharmacy and poor mental health, less is known about the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptomology among U.S.-born older Mexican Americans. Aim: This study aimed to test the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms [...] Read more.
Background: Although some studies have suggested a link between polypharmacy and poor mental health, less is known about the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptomology among U.S.-born older Mexican Americans. Aim: This study aimed to test the association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms in U.S.-born older Latino Americans. Materials and methods: Data came from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging (SALSA 2008). A total of 691 U.S.-born older (age >= 65) Mexican Americans entered this analysis. Polypharmacy was the independent variable. Level of depressive symptoms was the outcome. Age, gender, socioeconomic status (education, income, and employment), retirement status, health (chronic medical conditions, self-rated health, and activities of daily living), language, acculturation, and smoking were the covariates. A linear regression model was used to analyze the data. Results: We found a positive association between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms, which was above and beyond demographic factors, socioeconomic status, physical health, health behaviors, language, acculturation, and health insurance. Conclusion: Polypharmacy is linked to depressive symptoms in U.S.-born older Mexican Americans. More research is needed to test the effects of reducing inappropriate polypharmacy on mental well-being of first and second generation older Mexican Americans. There is also a need to study the role of drug-drug interaction in explaining the observed link between polypharmacy and depressive symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
Open AccessArticle
An Analysis of Acculturation Status and Healthcare Coverage for the Needs of Mental Health Service Utilization among Latinos in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama
Psych 2019, 1(1), 460-468; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych1010035 - 30 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background: The use of mental health services by Latinos is only 7.3%, despite the high prevalence of depression rates of between 27.0% and 38.0% in the United States. Research is limited concerning Latinos’ acculturation status and healthcare coverage on mental healthcare service utilization [...] Read more.
Background: The use of mental health services by Latinos is only 7.3%, despite the high prevalence of depression rates of between 27.0% and 38.0% in the United States. Research is limited concerning Latinos’ acculturation status and healthcare coverage on mental healthcare service utilization in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Alabama. Therefore, the objective of this study is to examine the association of acculturation status and healthcare coverage with mental health service utilization in the Latino population. Methods: During 2011–2012, a Latino Community Health Needs Assessment was administered by a trained bilingual interviewer using participants’ preferred language. Four hundred and eleven community members and leaders participated in the study. Acculturation status and self-reported mental health service utilization were retrieved from the survey instrument. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. Results: In multivariate logistic regression that included gender, education level, healthcare coverage, depression, and acculturation status, individuals with a high acculturation score (3–5) were 1.53 times more likely to utilize mental health services compared to those with a low acculturation score (0–2). Individuals with healthcare coverage were 2.75 times more likely to utilize mental health services compared to those with not having healthcare coverage. Healthcare coverage is only a significant determinant of mental health service utilization. Conclusions: This result underscores the importance of having healthcare coverage for the need of mental health service utilization. Future research should consider the impact of acculturation and healthcare coverage on mental health service utilization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Health, Social Psychology and Psychiatry)
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