Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
The Importance of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms for Vaccination Success and Susceptibility to Viral Infections
Previous Article in Journal
Depriving Mice of Sleep also Deprives of Food
Previous Article in Special Issue
Player Chronotype Does Not Affect In-Game Performance during the Evening (>18:00 h) in Professional Male Basketball Players
Review

Hormone Targets for the Treatment of Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women with Schizophrenia: A Narrative Review

1
Department of Mental Health, Mutua Terrassa University Hospital, University of Barcelona, 08221 Terrassa, Spain
2
Centre for Investigation and Research in Sleep (CIRS), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland
3
Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Déu, Sant Boi Llobregat, 08830 Barcelona, Spain
4
Department of Psychiatry, Bellvitge University Hospital, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Neurosciences Group—Psychiatry and Mental Health, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, 08907 L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain
5
Department of Mental Health, Consorci Sanitari del Maresme, Fundació Parc Taulí, CIBERSAM, 08340 Mataró, Spain
6
Neurosciences Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, CIBERSAM, 08221 Terrassa, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Clocks & Sleep 2022, 4(1), 52-65; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010007
Received: 8 January 2022 / Revised: 28 January 2022 / Accepted: 4 February 2022 / Published: 15 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Role of Sleep and Circadian Rhythms in Health II)
While the early identification of insomnia in patients with schizophrenia is of clinical relevance, the use of specific compounds to treat insomnia has been studied less in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia. We aimed to explore the effects of melatonin, sex hormones, and raloxifene for the treatment of insomnia in these populations. Although melatonin treatment improved the quality and efficiency of the sleep of patients with schizophrenia, few studies have explored its use in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia. The estrogen and progesterone pathways are dysregulated in major psychiatric disorders, such as in schizophrenia. While, in the context of menopause, a high testosterone-to-estradiol ratio is associated with higher frequencies of depressive symptoms, the effects of estradiol and other sex hormones on sleep disorders in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia has not been sufficiently investigated. Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, has shown positive effects on sleep disorders in postmenopausal women. Future studies should investigate the effectiveness of hormonal compounds on insomnia in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia. View Full-Text
Keywords: schizophrenia; delusional disorder; sleep; insomnia; treatment schizophrenia; delusional disorder; sleep; insomnia; treatment
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

González-Rodríguez, A.; Haba-Rubio, J.; Usall, J.; Natividad, M.; Soria, V.; Labad, J.; Monreal, J.A. Hormone Targets for the Treatment of Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women with Schizophrenia: A Narrative Review. Clocks & Sleep 2022, 4, 52-65. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010007

AMA Style

González-Rodríguez A, Haba-Rubio J, Usall J, Natividad M, Soria V, Labad J, Monreal JA. Hormone Targets for the Treatment of Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women with Schizophrenia: A Narrative Review. Clocks & Sleep. 2022; 4(1):52-65. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010007

Chicago/Turabian Style

González-Rodríguez, Alexandre, José Haba-Rubio, Judith Usall, Mentxu Natividad, Virginia Soria, Javier Labad, and José A. Monreal. 2022. "Hormone Targets for the Treatment of Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women with Schizophrenia: A Narrative Review" Clocks & Sleep 4, no. 1: 52-65. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010007

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop