Next Article in Journal
Hormone Targets for the Treatment of Sleep Disorders in Postmenopausal Women with Schizophrenia: A Narrative Review
Previous Article in Journal
Working around the Clock: Is a Person’s Endogenous Circadian Timing for Optimal Neurobehavioral Functioning Inherently Task-Dependent?
 
 
Article

Depriving Mice of Sleep also Deprives of Food

1
Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
2
Mouse Metabolic Evaluation Facility, Center for Integrative Genomics, University of Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Clocks & Sleep 2022, 4(1), 37-51; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010006
Received: 22 December 2021 / Revised: 31 January 2022 / Accepted: 5 February 2022 / Published: 11 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Basic Research)
Both sleep-wake behavior and circadian rhythms are tightly coupled to energy metabolism and food intake. Altered feeding times in mice are known to entrain clock gene rhythms in the brain and liver, and sleep-deprived humans tend to eat more and gain weight. Previous observations in mice showing that sleep deprivation (SD) changes clock gene expression might thus relate to altered food intake, and not to the loss of sleep per se. Whether SD affects food intake in the mouse and how this might affect clock gene expression is, however, unknown. We therefore quantified (i) the cortical expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Dbp, and Cry1 in mice that had access to food or not during a 6 h SD, and (ii) food intake during baseline, SD, and recovery sleep. We found that food deprivation did not modify the SD-incurred clock gene changes in the cortex. Moreover, we discovered that although food intake during SD did not differ from the baseline, mice lost weight and increased food intake during subsequent recovery. We conclude that SD is associated with food deprivation and that the resulting energy deficit might contribute to the effects of SD that are commonly interpreted as a response to sleep loss. View Full-Text
Keywords: circadian rhythms; clock genes; sleep deprivation; food intake; energy expenditure; body composition; lean body mass; fat circadian rhythms; clock genes; sleep deprivation; food intake; energy expenditure; body composition; lean body mass; fat
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Đukanović, N.; La Spada, F.; Emmenegger, Y.; Niederhäuser, G.; Preitner, F.; Franken, P. Depriving Mice of Sleep also Deprives of Food. Clocks & Sleep 2022, 4, 37-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010006

AMA Style

Đukanović N, La Spada F, Emmenegger Y, Niederhäuser G, Preitner F, Franken P. Depriving Mice of Sleep also Deprives of Food. Clocks & Sleep. 2022; 4(1):37-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010006

Chicago/Turabian Style

Đukanović, Nina, Francesco La Spada, Yann Emmenegger, Guy Niederhäuser, Frédéric Preitner, and Paul Franken. 2022. "Depriving Mice of Sleep also Deprives of Food" Clocks & Sleep 4, no. 1: 37-51. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep4010006

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop