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Open AccessTutorial

How to Report Light Exposure in Human Chronobiology and Sleep Research Experiments

1
Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG, UK
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Centre for Chronobiology, Psychiatric Hospital of the University of Basel (UPK), 4002 Basel, Switzerland
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Transfaculty Research Platform Molecular and Cognitive Neurosciences, University of Basel, 4055 Basel, Switzerland
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Federal Institute of Metrology METAS, 3003 Bern-Wabern, Switzerland
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Lyon Neuroscience Research Center, Waking team, INSERM UMRS 1028, CNRS UMR 5292, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon, France
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Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, 18 Innovation Walk, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
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Division of Neuroscience and Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1(3), 280-289; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1030024
Received: 2 May 2019 / Revised: 12 June 2019 / Accepted: 13 June 2019 / Published: 26 June 2019
Exposure to light has short- and long-term impacts on non-visual responses in humans. While many aspects related to non-visual light sensitivity have been characterised (such as the action spectrum for melatonin suppression), much remains to be elucidated. Here, we provide a set of minimum reporting guidelines for reporting the stimulus conditions involving light as an intervention in chronobiology, sleep research and environmental psychology experiments. Corresponding to the current state-of-the-art knowledge (June 2019), these are (i) measure and report the spectral power distribution of the acute stimulus from the observer’s point of view; (ii) measure and report the spectral power distribution of the background light environment from the observer’s point of view; (iii), make spectra available in tabulated form, (iv) report α-opic (ir)radiances and illuminance; (v) describe the timing properties of stimulus (duration and pattern); (vi) describe the spatial properties of stimulus (spatial arrangement and extent), and (vii) report measurement conditions and equipment. We supplement the minimum reporting guidelines with optional reporting suggestions and discuss limitations of the reporting scheme. View Full-Text
Keywords: chronobiology; sleep research; environmental psychology; light exposure; reporting; retina; non-visual function; reproducible research chronobiology; sleep research; environmental psychology; light exposure; reporting; retina; non-visual function; reproducible research
MDPI and ACS Style

Spitschan, M.; Stefani, O.; Blattner, P.; Gronfier, C.; Lockley, S.W.; Lucas, R.J. How to Report Light Exposure in Human Chronobiology and Sleep Research Experiments. Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1, 280-289.

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  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.17605/OSF.IO/K3V2T
    Link: https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/K3V2T
    Description: Resource containing up-to-date information on reporting light exposure in chronobiology and sleep research experiments
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