Next Article in Journal
Later Chronotype Is Associated with Higher Alcohol Consumption and More Adverse Childhood Experiences in Young Healthy Women
Previous Article in Journal
Delayed Sleep in Winter Related to Natural Daylight Exposure among Arctic Day Workers
Article

Risk Factors for Snoring in Two Canadian First Nations Communities

1
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 2Z4, Canada
2
Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W8, Canada
3
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E5, Canada
4
College of Nursing, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, Saskatoon, SK S7N 2Z4, Canada
5
Community A, PO Box 96, Duck Lake, SK S0K1J0, Canada
6
Department of Academic Family Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, West Winds Primary Health Centre, 3311 Fairlight Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7M 3Y5, Canada
7
Division of Respirology, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 103 Hospital Drive, Saskatoon, SK S7N 0W8, Canada
8
Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Suite 425, 155 College Street, Toronto, ON M5T 3M6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1(1), 117-125; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010011
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
Snoring may be an important predictor of sleep-disordered breathing. Factors related to snoring among First Nations people are not well understood in a population with high rates of smoking and excess body weight. An interviewer-administered survey was conducted among 874 individual participants from 406 households in 2012 and 2013 in two Canadian First Nations communities. The survey collected information on demographic variables, individual and contextual determinants of respiratory health and snoring (classified as present versus absent) and self-reported height and weight. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between snoring and potential risk factors adjusting for age and sex. Snoring was present in 46.2% men and 47.0% women. Considering body mass index, 259 people (30.3%) were overweight and 311 (36.4%) were considered obese. The combined current/former smoking rate was 90.2%. Being overweight, obesity, sinus trouble, current smoking status and former smoking were significantly associated with snoring. Exposure to home dampness and mold were suggestive of an association with snoring. To the degree that snoring may be a predictor of possible sleep-disordered breathing, these results indicate that environmental conditions such as smoking and home exposures may be important factors in the pathogenesis of these conditions. View Full-Text
Keywords: First Nations people; snoring; overweight; obesity; smoking; dampness First Nations people; snoring; overweight; obesity; smoking; dampness
MDPI and ACS Style

Dosman, J.A.; Karunanayake, C.P.; McMullin, K.; Abonyi, S.; Rennie, D.; Lawson, J.; Kirychuk, S.; Koehncke, N.; Seeseequasis, J.; Jimmy, L.; Ramsden, V.R.; Fenton, M.; Marchildon, G.P.; King, M.; Pahwa, P.; for the First Nations Lung Health Project Team. Risk Factors for Snoring in Two Canadian First Nations Communities. Clocks & Sleep 2019, 1, 117-125. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010011

AMA Style

Dosman JA, Karunanayake CP, McMullin K, Abonyi S, Rennie D, Lawson J, Kirychuk S, Koehncke N, Seeseequasis J, Jimmy L, Ramsden VR, Fenton M, Marchildon GP, King M, Pahwa P, for the First Nations Lung Health Project Team. Risk Factors for Snoring in Two Canadian First Nations Communities. Clocks & Sleep. 2019; 1(1):117-125. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dosman, James A., Chandima P. Karunanayake, Kathleen McMullin, Sylvia Abonyi, Donna Rennie, Joshua Lawson, Shelley Kirychuk, Niels Koehncke, Jeremy Seeseequasis, Laurie Jimmy, Vivian R. Ramsden, Mark Fenton, Gregory P. Marchildon, Malcolm King, Punam Pahwa, and for the First Nations Lung Health Project Team. 2019. "Risk Factors for Snoring in Two Canadian First Nations Communities" Clocks & Sleep 1, no. 1: 117-125. https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010011

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop