Next Article in Journal
Good Things in Small Packages? Evaluating an Economy of Scale Approach to Behavioral Health Promotion in Rural America
Previous Article in Journal
Octyl Gallate as an Intervention Catalyst to Augment Antifungal Efficacy of Caspofungin
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
J 2018, 1(1), 29-41; https://doi.org/10.3390/j1010005

Educational Attainment Promotes Fruit and Vegetable Intake for Whites but Not Blacks

1
Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
BRITE Center for Science, Research and Policy, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
3
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture, and Health (CRECH), School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, USA
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, 4250 Plymouth Rd., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2700, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 May 2018 / Revised: 16 May 2018 / Accepted: 1 June 2018 / Published: 3 June 2018
Full-Text   |   PDF [273 KB, uploaded 30 October 2018]

Abstract

Background. Although the protective effects of socioeconomic status (SES) on health behaviors are well-known, according to the minorities’ diminished return theory, the health return of SES, particularly educational attainment, is systemically smaller for minorities than Whites. Aims. The current study explored Black–White differences in the effects of educational attainment and income on the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Methods. This cross-sectional study used the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 2017 (n = 3217). HINTS is a nationally representative survey of American adults. The current analysis included 2277 adults who were either non-Hispanic White (n = 1868; 82%) or non-Hispanic Black (n = 409; 18%). The independent variables in this study were SES (educational attainment and income). The dependent variable was consumption of fruits and vegetables. Race was the focal moderator. Results. In the overall sample, high educational attainment and income were associated with higher consumption of fruits and vegetables. Race moderated the effect of educational attainment but not income on the consumption of fruits and vegetables. Conclusion. In line with the past research in the United States, Whites constantly gain more health benefits from the very same educational attainment than Blacks. The health gain from income is more equal across races than the health gain from educational attainment. Such diminished returns may be due to racism across institutions in the United States. View Full-Text
Keywords: diet; nutrition; fruit and vegetable; population groups; race; Whites; Blacks; African-Americans; socioeconomics; education; income diet; nutrition; fruit and vegetable; population groups; race; Whites; Blacks; African-Americans; socioeconomics; education; income
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Assari, S.; Lankarani, M.M. Educational Attainment Promotes Fruit and Vegetable Intake for Whites but Not Blacks. J 2018, 1, 29-41.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
J EISSN 2571-8800 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top