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Impact of Recycled Water Irrigation on Soil Salinity and Its Remediation
Review

Beneficial Microbes and Molecules for Mitigation of Soil Salinity in Brassica Species: A Review

1
Division for Marine and Environmental Research, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia
2
Department of Food Technology, University Center Koprivnica, University North, Trg dr. Žarka Dolinara 1, 48000 Koprivnica, Croatia
3
Department for Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Sarajevo, Zmaja od Bosne 33-35, 71000 Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina
4
Department for Molecular Biology, Ruđer Bošković Institute, Bijenička 54, 10002 Zagreb, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Thomas Baumgartl and Mandana Shaygan
Soil Syst. 2022, 6(1), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems6010018
Received: 16 December 2021 / Revised: 28 January 2022 / Accepted: 29 January 2022 / Published: 3 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Prediction and Remediation of Soil Salinization)
Salt stress results from excessive salt accumulation in the soil can lead to a reduction in plant growth and yield. Due to climate change, in the future climatic pressures, changed precipitation cycles and increased temperature will increase the pressures on agriculture, including increasing severity of salt stress. Brassica species contains oilseed and vegetable crops with great economic importance. Advances in understanding the mechanisms of salt stress in Brassica plants have enabled the development of approaches to better induce plant defense mechanisms at the time of their occurrence through the use of beneficial microorganisms or molecules. Both endophytic and rhizospheric microbes contribute to the mitigation of abiotic stresses in Brassica plants by promoting the growth of their host under stress conditions. In this review we summarized so far reported microorganisms with beneficial effects on Brassica plants and their mode of action. Another approach in mitigating the harmful effect of soil salinity may involve the application of different molecules that are involved in the stress response of Brassica plants. We reviewed and summarized their potential mode of action, methods of application and pointed out further research directions. View Full-Text
Keywords: Brassica; priming; soil salinity; stress tolerance Brassica; priming; soil salinity; stress tolerance
MDPI and ACS Style

Petrić, I.; Šamec, D.; Karalija, E.; Salopek-Sondi, B. Beneficial Microbes and Molecules for Mitigation of Soil Salinity in Brassica Species: A Review. Soil Syst. 2022, 6, 18. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems6010018

AMA Style

Petrić I, Šamec D, Karalija E, Salopek-Sondi B. Beneficial Microbes and Molecules for Mitigation of Soil Salinity in Brassica Species: A Review. Soil Systems. 2022; 6(1):18. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems6010018

Chicago/Turabian Style

Petrić, Ines, Dunja Šamec, Erna Karalija, and Branka Salopek-Sondi. 2022. "Beneficial Microbes and Molecules for Mitigation of Soil Salinity in Brassica Species: A Review" Soil Systems 6, no. 1: 18. https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems6010018

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