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Soil Syst. 2019, 3(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/soilsystems3010001

The Controls of Iron and Oxygen on Hydroxyl Radical (•OH) Production in Soils

1
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 13 October 2018 / Revised: 4 December 2018 / Accepted: 19 December 2018 / Published: 26 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron and Manganese Biogeochemical Cycling in Soils)
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Abstract

Hydroxyl radical (•OH) is produced in soils from oxidation of reduced iron (Fe(II)) by dissolved oxygen (O2) and can oxidize dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to carbon dioxide (CO2). Understanding the role of •OH on CO2 production in soils requires knowing whether Fe(II) production or O2 supply to soils limits •OH production. To test the relative importance of Fe(II) production versus O2 supply, we measured changes in Fe(II) and O2 and in situ •OH production during simulated precipitation events and during common, waterlogged conditions in mesocosms from two landscape ages and the two dominant vegetation types of the Arctic. The balance of Fe(II) production and consumption controlled •OH production during precipitation events that supplied O2 to the soils. During static, waterlogged conditions, •OH production was controlled by O2 supply because Fe(II) production was higher than its consumption (oxidation) by O2. An average precipitation event (4 mm) resulted in 200 µmol •OH m−2 per day produced compared to 60 µmol •OH m−2 per day produced during waterlogged conditions. These findings suggest that the oxidation of DOC to CO2 by •OH in arctic soils, a process potentially as important as microbial respiration of DOC in arctic surface waters, will depend on the patterns and amounts of rainfall that oxygenate the soil. View Full-Text
Keywords: iron; hydroxyl radical; dissolved organic carbon; carbon cycling; arctic soils iron; hydroxyl radical; dissolved organic carbon; carbon cycling; arctic soils
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Trusiak, A.; Treibergs, L.A.; Kling, G.W.; Cory, R.M. The Controls of Iron and Oxygen on Hydroxyl Radical (•OH) Production in Soils. Soil Syst. 2019, 3, 1.

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