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Article

Clinical Use of Surface Electromyography to Track Acute Upper Extremity Muscle Recovery after Stroke: A Descriptive Case Study of a Single Patient

1
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
2
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA
3
Harborview Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98104, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Christos Douligeris
Appl. Syst. Innov. 2021, 4(2), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/asi4020032
Received: 4 April 2021 / Revised: 29 April 2021 / Accepted: 4 May 2021 / Published: 10 May 2021
Arm recovery varies greatly among stroke survivors. Wearable surface electromyography (sEMG) sensors have been used to track recovery in research; however, sEMG is rarely used within acute and subacute clinical settings. The purpose of this case study was to describe the use of wireless sEMG sensors to examine changes in muscle activity during acute and subacute phases of stroke recovery, and understand the participant’s perceptions of sEMG monitoring. Beginning three days post-stroke, one stroke survivor wore five wireless sEMG sensors on his involved arm for three to four hours, every one to three days. Muscle activity was tracked during routine care in the acute setting through discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Three- and eight-month follow-up sessions were completed in the community. Activity logs were completed each session, and a semi-structured interview occurred at the final session. The longitudinal monitoring of muscle and movement recovery in the clinic and community was feasible using sEMG sensors. The participant and medical team felt monitoring was unobtrusive, interesting, and motivating for recovery, but desired greater in-session feedback to inform rehabilitation. While barriers in equipment and signal quality still exist, capitalizing on wearable sensing technology in the clinic holds promise for enabling personalized stroke recovery. View Full-Text
Keywords: surface electromyography; stroke; neurorehabilitation; upper extremity; case study; acute care; sub-acute rehabilitation surface electromyography; stroke; neurorehabilitation; upper extremity; case study; acute care; sub-acute rehabilitation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Feldner, H.A.; Papazian, C.; Peters, K.M.; Creutzfeldt, C.J.; Steele, K.M. Clinical Use of Surface Electromyography to Track Acute Upper Extremity Muscle Recovery after Stroke: A Descriptive Case Study of a Single Patient. Appl. Syst. Innov. 2021, 4, 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/asi4020032

AMA Style

Feldner HA, Papazian C, Peters KM, Creutzfeldt CJ, Steele KM. Clinical Use of Surface Electromyography to Track Acute Upper Extremity Muscle Recovery after Stroke: A Descriptive Case Study of a Single Patient. Applied System Innovation. 2021; 4(2):32. https://doi.org/10.3390/asi4020032

Chicago/Turabian Style

Feldner, Heather A., Christina Papazian, Keshia M. Peters, Claire J. Creutzfeldt, and Katherine M. Steele 2021. "Clinical Use of Surface Electromyography to Track Acute Upper Extremity Muscle Recovery after Stroke: A Descriptive Case Study of a Single Patient" Applied System Innovation 4, no. 2: 32. https://doi.org/10.3390/asi4020032

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