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Article

Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Water-Atomized Iron-Based Powders: Process Optimization

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Department of Mechanical Engineering, École de technologie supérieure, 1100 Notre-Dame Street West, Montreal, QC H3C 1K3, Canada
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Research and Development, Rio Tinto Metal Powders, 1655, route Marie-Victorin, Sorel-Tracy, QC J3R 4R4, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2017, 1(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp1020023
Received: 30 October 2017 / Revised: 10 December 2017 / Accepted: 14 December 2017 / Published: 17 December 2017
The laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) technology was adapted for use with non-spherical low-cost water-atomized iron powders. A simplified numerical and experimental modeling approach was applied to determine—in a first approximation—the operation window for the selected powder in terms of laser power, scanning speed, hatching space, and layer thickness. The operation window, delimited by a build rate ranging from 4 to 25 cm3/h, and a volumetric energy density ranging from 50 to 190 J/mm3, was subsequently optimized to improve the density, the mechanical properties, and the surface roughness of the manufactured specimens. Standard L-PBF-built specimens were subjected to microstructural (porosity, grain size) and metrological (accuracy, shrinkage, minimum wall thickness, surface roughness) analyses and mechanical testing (three-point bending and tensile tests). The results of the microstructural, metrological and mechanical characterizations of the L-PBF-built specimens subjected to stress relieve annealing and hot isostatic pressing were then compared with those obtained with conventional pressing-sintering technology. Finally, by using an energy density of 70 J/mm3 and a build rate of 9 cm3/h, it was possible to manufacture 99.8%-dense specimens with an ultimate strength of 330 MPa and an elongation to failure of 30%, despite the relatively poor circularity of the powder used. View Full-Text
Keywords: additive manufacturing; laser powder bed fusion; process optimization; water atomized; iron based powder additive manufacturing; laser powder bed fusion; process optimization; water atomized; iron based powder
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MDPI and ACS Style

Letenneur, M.; Brailovski, V.; Kreitcberg, A.; Paserin, V.; Bailon-Poujol, I. Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Water-Atomized Iron-Based Powders: Process Optimization. J. Manuf. Mater. Process. 2017, 1, 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp1020023

AMA Style

Letenneur M, Brailovski V, Kreitcberg A, Paserin V, Bailon-Poujol I. Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Water-Atomized Iron-Based Powders: Process Optimization. Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing. 2017; 1(2):23. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp1020023

Chicago/Turabian Style

Letenneur, Morgan, Vladimir Brailovski, Alena Kreitcberg, Vladimir Paserin, and Ian Bailon-Poujol. 2017. "Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Water-Atomized Iron-Based Powders: Process Optimization" Journal of Manufacturing and Materials Processing 1, no. 2: 23. https://doi.org/10.3390/jmmp1020023

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