Next Article in Journal
Neuroinvasive West Nile Infection with an Unusual Clinical Presentation: A Single-Center Case Series
Next Article in Special Issue
A One Health Approach for Guinea Worm Disease Control: Scope and Opportunities
Previous Article in Journal
HSV-2 Infection as a Potential Cofactor for HIV Disease Progression and Selection of Drug Resistance Mutations in Adults under WHO-Recommended First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy: A Multicentric, Cross-Sectional Study in Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, and Gabon
Previous Article in Special Issue
An Integrated Study of Toxocara Infection in Honduran Children: Human Seroepidemiology and Environmental Contamination in a Coastal Community
Open AccessReview

Intestinal Schistosomiasis and Giardiasis Co-Infection in Sub-Saharan Africa: Can a One Health Approach Improve Control of Each Waterborne Parasite Simultaneously?

1
Wolfson Wellcome Biomedical Laboratories, Department of Zoology, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK
2
Department of Tropical Disease Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK
3
Department of Tropical Infectious Diseases, Ministry of Health, Asir District, Abha 61411, Saudi Arabia
4
Department of Clinical Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK
5
Vector Control Division, Ministry of Health, Kampala 759125, Uganda
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5(3), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed5030137
Received: 6 July 2020 / Revised: 16 August 2020 / Accepted: 19 August 2020 / Published: 25 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue One Health and Neglected Tropical Diseases)
Both intestinal schistosomiasis and giardiasis are co-endemic throughout many areas of sub-Saharan Africa, significantly impacting the health of millions of children in endemic areas. While giardiasis is not considered a neglected tropical disease (NTD), intestinal schistosomiasis is formally grouped under the NTD umbrella and receives significant advocacy and financial support for large-scale control. Although there are differences in the epidemiology between these two diseases, there are also key similarities that might be exploited within potential integrated control strategies permitting tandem interventions. In this review, we highlight these similarities and discuss opportunities for integrated control of giardiasis in low and middle-income countries where intestinal schistosomiasis is co-endemic. By applying new, advanced methods of disease surveillance, and by improving the provision of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) initiatives, (co)infection with intestinal schistosomiasis and/or giardiasis could not only be more effectively controlled but also better understood. In this light, we appraise the suitability of a One Health approach targeting both intestinal schistosomiasis and giardiasis, for if adopted more broadly, transmission of both diseases could be reduced to gain improvements in health and wellbeing. View Full-Text
Keywords: One Health; Schistosoma mansoni; Giardia duodenalis; water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); Uganda One Health; Schistosoma mansoni; Giardia duodenalis; water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); Uganda
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Archer, J.; O’Halloran, L.; Al-Shehri, H.; Summers, S.; Bhattacharyya, T.; Kabaterine, N.B.; Atuhaire, A.; Adriko, M.; Arianaitwe, M.; Stewart, M.; LaCourse, E.J.; Webster, B.L.; Bustinduy, A.L.; Stothard, J.R. Intestinal Schistosomiasis and Giardiasis Co-Infection in Sub-Saharan Africa: Can a One Health Approach Improve Control of Each Waterborne Parasite Simultaneously? Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2020, 5, 137.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop