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Open AccessArticle

Prevalence of Giardia intestinalis Infection in Schistosomiasis-Endemic Areas in South-Central Mali

1
Institut National de Recherche en Santé Publique, B.P. 1771, Bamako, Mali
2
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Hygiene, Saarland University, 66421 Homburg/Saar, Germany
3
Coris BioConcept, 5032 Gembloux, Belgium
4
Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH–4002 Basel, Switzerland
5
University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH–4003 Basel, Switzerland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(2), 86; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4020086
Received: 5 May 2019 / Revised: 20 May 2019 / Accepted: 21 May 2019 / Published: 23 May 2019
Intestinal parasite infections are frequent causes of diarrhea and malnutrition among children in the tropics. Transmission of helminths and intestinal protozoa is intimately connected with conditions of poverty, including inadequate sanitation and hygiene. Concurrent infections with several intestinal pathogens may lead to excess morbidity. Yet, there is a paucity of epidemiological data from Mali. In this study, stool samples from 56 individuals, aged 2–63 years, from Bamako and Niono, south-central Mali were examined for intestinal parasites using stool microscopy. Additionally, stool samples were subjected to a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis. The predominant pathogens were Schistosoma mansoni and G. intestinalis with prevalences of 41% and 38%, respectively. Hymenolepis nana was detected in 4% of the participants, while no eggs of soil-transmitted helminths were found. Concurrent infections with G. intestinalis and S. mansoni were diagnosed in 16% of the participants. For the detection of G. intestinalis, PCR was more sensitive (100%) than RDT (62%) and microscopy (48%). As helminth-protozoa coinfections might have important implications for morbidity control programs, future studies should employ diagnostic tools beyond stool microscopy to accurately assess the co-endemicity of giardiasis and schistosomiasis. View Full-Text
Keywords: BD Max Enteric Parasite Panel; diarrhea; Giardia intestinalis; Mali; polymerase chain reaction; rapid diagnostic test; Schistosoma mansoni; stool microscopy BD Max Enteric Parasite Panel; diarrhea; Giardia intestinalis; Mali; polymerase chain reaction; rapid diagnostic test; Schistosoma mansoni; stool microscopy
MDPI and ACS Style

Fofana, H.K.; Schwarzkopf, M.; Doumbia, M.N.; Saye, R.; Nimmesgern, A.; Landouré, A.; Traoré, M.S.; Mertens, P.; Utzinger, J.; Sacko, M.; Becker, S.L. Prevalence of Giardia intestinalis Infection in Schistosomiasis-Endemic Areas in South-Central Mali. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4, 86.

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