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Article

Security Issues in Shared Automated Mobility Systems: A Feminist HCI Perspective

1
CARISSMA Institute of Automated Driving, Technische Hochschule Ingolstadt (THI), 85049 Ingolstadt, Germany
2
Institute for Pervasive Computing, Johannes Kepler University Linz (JKU), 4020 Linz, Austria
3
Institute of Visual Computing and Human-Centered Technology, TU Wien, 1040 Vienna, Austria
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Kevin Warwick and Mu-Chun Su
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(8), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080043
Received: 29 January 2021 / Revised: 3 May 2021 / Accepted: 28 July 2021 / Published: 7 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interface and Experience Design for Future Mobility)
The spread of automated vehicles (AVs) is expected to disrupt our mobility behavior. Currently, a male bias is prevalent in the technology industry in general, and in the automotive industry in particular, mainly focusing on white men. This leads to an under-representation of groups of people with other social, physiological, and psychological characteristics. The advent of automated driving (AD) should be taken as an opportunity to mitigate this bias and consider a diverse variety of people within the development process. We conducted a qualitative, exploratory study to investigate how shared automated vehicles (SAVs) should be designed from a pluralistic perspective considering a holistic viewpoint on the whole passenger journey by including booking, pick-up, and drop-off points. Both, men and women, emphasized the importance of SAVs being flexible and clean, whereas security issues were mentioned exclusively by our female participants. While proposing different potential solutions to mitigate security matters, we discuss them through the lens of the feminist HCI framework. View Full-Text
Keywords: shared automated vehicles; feminist HCI; gender-bias; automated systems shared automated vehicles; feminist HCI; gender-bias; automated systems
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schuß, M.; Wintersberger, P.; Riener, A. Security Issues in Shared Automated Mobility Systems: A Feminist HCI Perspective. Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5, 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080043

AMA Style

Schuß M, Wintersberger P, Riener A. Security Issues in Shared Automated Mobility Systems: A Feminist HCI Perspective. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction. 2021; 5(8):43. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080043

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schuß, Martina, Philipp Wintersberger, and Andreas Riener. 2021. "Security Issues in Shared Automated Mobility Systems: A Feminist HCI Perspective" Multimodal Technologies and Interaction 5, no. 8: 43. https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080043

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