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Multimodal Technol. Interact., Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2017) – 4 articles

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Open AccessArticle
The Cyborg Mermaid (or: How Technè Can Help the Misfits Fit In)
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2017, 1(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti1010004 - 24 Feb 2017
Viewed by 2108
Abstract
In feminist studies, the figure of the mermaid has long been regarded as flawed, disabled and less-than-human. Her theoretical counterpart in that respect would be the cyborg, an image used to show that with the aid of robotics, humankind could be larger than [...] Read more.
In feminist studies, the figure of the mermaid has long been regarded as flawed, disabled and less-than-human. Her theoretical counterpart in that respect would be the cyborg, an image used to show that with the aid of robotics, humankind could be larger than life. What would happen if we could combine those two images and apply them to create “super love” more-than-human relationships? This article explores the possibilities of technology for “mermaids”, people who normally fall outside the norm, to satisfy human desires in a new way. Two case studies will be presented, first we will look at people who identify as having ASD (Autism Spectre Disorders) and second we explore the use of technology for people who have BDSM-oriented desires (related to Bondage and Discipline (B&D), Dominance and Submission (D&S), and Sadism and Masochism (S&M)). We briefly discuss the added value of practice theory for exploring how people are altered by technè. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Love and Sex with Robots)
Open AccessArticle
Not Only the Lonely—How Men Explicitly and Implicitly Evaluate the Attractiveness of Sex Robots in Comparison to the Attractiveness of Women, and Personal Characteristics Influencing This Evaluation
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2017, 1(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti1010003 - 10 Feb 2017
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3210
Abstract
While some theories, such as the Media Equation, suggest that men will evaluate sex robots to be attractive, other assumptions (e.g., biases of norm adherence) would contradict this hypothesis. Therefore, the present study aimed at empirically comparing men’s explicit and implicit evaluation of [...] Read more.
While some theories, such as the Media Equation, suggest that men will evaluate sex robots to be attractive, other assumptions (e.g., biases of norm adherence) would contradict this hypothesis. Therefore, the present study aimed at empirically comparing men’s explicit and implicit evaluation of the (sexual) attractiveness of sex robots and women. At the same time, personal characteristics of the observer that might affect this evaluation were considered. An online survey (n = 229) and an affective priming experiment (n = 41) revealed that men rate women to be more attractive than robots if asked explicitly (=self-reported). However, this effect is not present when attractiveness is assessed implicitly (unbiased, directly). Moreover, affiliation-related traits such as loneliness, which have been assumed to be associated with the usage of sex dolls, are not related to the evaluation of attractiveness. Instead, a negative attitude towards robots is an important predictor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Love and Sex with Robots)
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Open AccessReview
Familiar and Strange: Gender, Sex, and Love in the Uncanny Valley
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2017, 1(1), 2; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti1010002 - 04 Jan 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3336
Abstract
Early robotics research held that increased realism should result in increased positivity of the interactions between people and humanoid robots. However, this turned out to be true only to a certain point, and researchers now recognize that human interactions with highly realistic humanoid [...] Read more.
Early robotics research held that increased realism should result in increased positivity of the interactions between people and humanoid robots. However, this turned out to be true only to a certain point, and researchers now recognize that human interactions with highly realistic humanoid robots are often marked by feelings of disgust, fear, anxiety, and distrust. This phenomenon is called the Uncanny Valley. In a world in which Artificial Companions are increasingly likely, and even desired, engineering humanoid robots that avoid the Uncanny Valley is of critical importance. This paper examines theories of the uncanny, and focuses on one in particular—that humans subconsciously appraise robots as potential sexual partners. Drawing from work on love, sexuality, and gender from a variety of fields, this paper speculates on possible futures in a world of intimate companionships between humans and machines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Love and Sex with Robots)
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Open AccessEditorial
Welcome to MTI—A New Open Access Journal Dealing with Blue Sky Research and Future Trends in Multimodal Technologies and Interaction
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2017, 1(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti1010001 - 20 Apr 2016
Viewed by 2036
Abstract
In this era of massive use of computers and other computational devices (e.g., low-cost wearable sensors, smartphones, other smart devices, etc.), the nature of digital data is becoming more complex and heterogeneous. Full article
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