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Determinants of Transport Mode Choice for Non-Commuting Trips: The Roles of Transport, Land Use and Socio-Demographic Characteristics

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Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland
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School of Architecture, Planning and Environmental Policy, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Urban Sci. 2019, 3(3), 82; https://doi.org/10.3390/urbansci3030082
Received: 24 June 2019 / Revised: 22 July 2019 / Accepted: 23 July 2019 / Published: 29 July 2019
Despite rapid changes in vehicle technology and the expansion of IT-based mobility solutions, travel habits must be changed to address the environmental and health implications of increasing car dependency. A significant amount of research focuses on commuting, which comprises the largest share of annual vehicle miles travelled. However, non-work trips are also significant, especially when considering trip frequency. Using empirical data (N = 1298) from an urban-rural region and bivariate statistical analysis, the relationship between the land use–transport configuration (6 types) and travel behaviour patterns is examined for 14 non-work destinations. The land use characterisation used in this research includes an updated means of representing a land use mix. By defining the typologies of land use and transport for use in the analysis, the findings can be directed towards contrasting area types in the region. A strong statistically significant association between the land use–transport configuration and mode-share for 14 non-work journey purposes is found. Using regression modelling, income and car ownership are identified as key influences on travel behaviour patterns. The results of both analyses show that, for non-work trips, the transport–land use relationship is as important as key socio-demographic indicators. However, the results for reductions in car travel are relatively small for the area typologies outside the inner-city core. This indicates that efforts to provide alternatives to car travel in order to mitigate car dependency should be prioritised in these outer urban areas. Appropriate management of spatial structure for non-work activity types such that active mode use is possible is essential. This will resolve some of the important environmental and health impacts of car dependency. View Full-Text
Keywords: land-use transport relationships; non-work travel; car dependency; daily travel behaviour pattern; land use mix; temporal; accessibility; retail; Dublin; Ireland land-use transport relationships; non-work travel; car dependency; daily travel behaviour pattern; land use mix; temporal; accessibility; retail; Dublin; Ireland
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Convery, S.; Williams, B. Determinants of Transport Mode Choice for Non-Commuting Trips: The Roles of Transport, Land Use and Socio-Demographic Characteristics. Urban Sci. 2019, 3, 82.

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