Next Article in Journal
Organic Molecules: Is It Possible to Distinguish Aromatics from Aliphatics Collected by Space Missions in High-Speed Impacts?
Next Article in Special Issue
Global Significance of Mangrove Blue Carbon in Climate Change Mitigation
Previous Article in Journal
A Comparison of Denoising Methods in Onset Determination in Medial Gastrocnemius Muscle Activations during Stance
Article

Process Controls of the Live Root Zone and Carbon Sequestration Capacity of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, Bangladesh

1
Department of Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2
Coastal Studies Institute, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
3
Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 May 2020 / Accepted: 11 May 2020 / Published: 15 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change Impacts on Mangrove Ecosystems)
The conservation of coastal wetland ecosystems, like mangrove forests and salt marshes, represents a critical strategy for mitigating atmospheric emissions and climate change in the 21st century. Yet the existence of these environments is threatened by human-induced disturbances, namely deforestation and accelerated sea-level rise. Coastal systems maintain surface elevation in response to sea-level rise through a combination of physical and biological processes both above and below the ground surface. The quantification and relative contribution of belowground process controls (e.g., seasonal water content, organic matter decomposition) on surface elevation change is largely unexplored but crucial for informing coastal ecosystem sustainability. To address this knowledge deficit, we integrated measurements of surface elevation change of the live root zone (0.5 to 1 m depth) with geotechnical data from co-located sediment cores in the Sundarbans mangrove forest (SMF) of southwest Bangladesh. Core data reveal that the primary belowground controls on surface elevation change include seasonal fluctuations in pore-water content and the relative abundance of fine-grained sediments capable of volumetric expansion and contraction, supporting an elevation gain of ~2.42 ± 0.26 cm year−1. In contrast to many mangrove environments, the soils of the SMF contain little organic matter and are dominantly composed (>90%) of inorganic clastic sediments. The mineral-rich soil texture likely leads to less compaction-induced subsidence as compared to organic-rich substrates and facilitates surface equilibrium in response to sea level rise. Despite a relatively high soil bulk density, soil carbon (C) density of the SMF is very low owing to the dearth of preserved organic content. However, rates of C accumulation are balanced out by locally high accretion rates, rendering the SMF a greater sink of terrestrial C than the worldwide mangrove average. The findings of this study demonstrate that C accumulation in the SMF, and possibly other alluvial mangrove forests, is highly dependent on the continued delivery of sediment to the mangrove platform and associated settings. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; sea-level rise; mangrove soils; surface elevation change; carbon storage climate change; sea-level rise; mangrove soils; surface elevation change; carbon storage
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Bomer, E.J.; Wilson, C.A.; Elsey-Quirk, T. Process Controls of the Live Root Zone and Carbon Sequestration Capacity of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, Bangladesh. Sci 2020, 2, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sci2030054

AMA Style

Bomer EJ, Wilson CA, Elsey-Quirk T. Process Controls of the Live Root Zone and Carbon Sequestration Capacity of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, Bangladesh. Sci. 2020; 2(3):54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sci2030054

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bomer, Edwin J., Carol A. Wilson, and Tracy Elsey-Quirk. 2020. "Process Controls of the Live Root Zone and Carbon Sequestration Capacity of the Sundarbans Mangrove Forest, Bangladesh" Sci 2, no. 3: 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/sci2030054

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop