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Stiffness and Strength Improvement of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Pavement Foundation Using Large-Scale Wheel Test

1
Aviation Engineer II, Pond and Company, Peachtree Corners, GA 30092, USA
2
Civil Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA
3
Department of Civil and Environment Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 04620, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Infrastructures 2020, 5(4), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5040033
Received: 2 March 2020 / Revised: 31 March 2020 / Accepted: 1 April 2020 / Published: 3 April 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Geomaterials for Transportation Infrastructures)
Laboratory cyclic plate load tests are commonly used in the assessment of geosynthetic performance in pavement applications due to the repeatability of testing results and the smaller required testing areas than traditional Accelerated Pavement Testing facilities. While the objective of traditional plate load testing procedure is to closely replicate traffic conditions, the reality is that rolling wheel loads produce different stresses in pavement layers than traditional cyclic plate load tests. This two-fold study investigates the differences between the stress response of subgrade soil from a rolling wheel load (replicating rolling traffic conditions) and a unidirectional dynamic load (replicating traditional plate load test procedures) in order to obtain a more realistic stress response of pavement layers from rolling wheel traffic. Ultimately, results show that the testing specimens that experienced rolling wheel loading had an average of 17% higher pressure measurements in the top of the subgrade than vertically loaded (unidirectional dynamic load) specimens. The second segment of this study is used in conjunction with the first to analyze aggregate base material behavior when using a geosynthetic for reinforcement. The study aimed to determine the difference in the post-trafficked strength and stiffness of pavement foundation. A Dynamic Cone Penetrometer and Light Weight Deflectometer were utilized to determine material changes from this trafficking and revealed that all specimens that included a geosynthetic had a higher base stiffness and strength while the specimen with geotextile and geogrid in combination created the highest stiffness and strength after large-scale rolling wheel trafficking. View Full-Text
Keywords: geosynthetics; subgrade; rolling wheel load; dynamic cone penetrometer; light weight deflectometer geosynthetics; subgrade; rolling wheel load; dynamic cone penetrometer; light weight deflectometer
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MDPI and ACS Style

Wright, J.; Kim, S.S.; Kim, B. Stiffness and Strength Improvement of Geosynthetic-Reinforced Pavement Foundation Using Large-Scale Wheel Test. Infrastructures 2020, 5, 33.

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