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Open AccessArticle

Competing Risks Models for the Assessment of Intelligent Transportation Systems Devices: A Case Study for Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Applications

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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida Agricultural & Mechanical University -Florida State University College of Engineering, 2525 Pottsdamer Street, Tallahassee, FL 32310, USA
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Department of Statistics, Florida State University, 214 Rogers Building (OSB), 117 N Woodward Ave., Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Infrastructures 2020, 5(3), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5030030
Received: 20 January 2020 / Revised: 19 February 2020 / Accepted: 29 February 2020 / Published: 15 March 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Smart Mobility)
Intelligent transportation system (ITS) has become a crucial section of transportation and traffic management systems in the past decades. As a result, transportation agencies keep improving the quality of transportation infrastructure management information for accessibility and security of transportation networks. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the impact of two competing risks: “natural deterioration” of ITS devices and hurricane-induced failure of the same components. The major devices employed in the architecture of this paper include closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras, automatic vehicle identification (AVI) systems, dynamic message signals (DMS), wireless communication systems and DMS towers. From the findings, it was evident that as ITS infrastructure devices age, the contribution of Hurricane Category 3 as a competing failure risk is higher and significant compared to the natural deterioration of devices. Hurricane Category 3 failure vs. natural deterioration indicated an average hazard ratio of 1.5 for CCTV, AVI and wireless communications systems and an average hazard ratio of 2.3 for DMS, DMS towers and portable DMS. The proportional hazard ratios of the Hurricane Category 1 compared to the devices was estimated as <0.001 and that of Hurricane Category 2 < 0.5, demonstrating the lesser impact of the Hurricane Categories 1 and 2. It is expedient to envisage and forecast the impact of hurricanes on the failure of wireless communication networks, vehicle detection systems and other message signals, in order to prevent vehicle to infrastructure connection disruption, especially for autonomous and connected vehicle systems. View Full-Text
Keywords: competing risks; survival analysis; failure modes; ITS network architecture competing risks; survival analysis; failure modes; ITS network architecture
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Inkoom, S.; Sobanjo, J.; Chicken, E. Competing Risks Models for the Assessment of Intelligent Transportation Systems Devices: A Case Study for Connected and Autonomous Vehicle Applications. Infrastructures 2020, 5, 30.

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