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Open AccessArticle

Properties of Blast-Furnace Slag Cement Concrete Subjected to Accelerated Curing

1
Graduate School of Engineering, Ashikaga University, Ashikaga 326 8558, Japan
2
Department of Civil Engineering, Ashikaga University, Ashikaga 326 8558, Japan
3
Technical Center, DC Co. Ltd., Kawasaki 212-0013, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Part of this work has been presented and published in the proceedings of the 43rd Our World in Concrete and Structures of Premier Conference, Singapore, 30–31 August 2018—pp. 395–402.
Infrastructures 2019, 4(4), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4040069
Received: 19 August 2019 / Revised: 15 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 31 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Infrastructures Materials and Constructions)
Accelerated curing is used for mass production in the precast concrete industry. Autogenous shrinkage and drying shrinkage occur in concrete, during and after accelerated curing. Thus, thermal cracks may occur in concrete due to both heating and cement hydration at early age, whereas drying shrinkage causes cracks after demolding. Ground granulated blast-furnace slag cement (GGBS), a byproduct in steel manufacture, has been used to improve concrete strength development during accelerated curing but poses a challenge of increased shrinkage. In this paper, two types of granulated blast-furnace slag cements were used to study mechanical and shrinkage properties of water cured and concrete subjected to accelerated curing. Limestone powder and gypsums, with two different types of fineness, were other additives used. An accelerated one day curing cycle was adopted that consisted of a 3 h delay period, heating to 65 °C, a peak temperature maintained for 3 h, and, finally, cooling. The results indicated that increment in gypsum fineness increased concrete expansion at one day for both sealed and accelerated cured concrete. In drying condition, similar shrinkage was observed. The addition of gypsum provided slightly lower shrinkage, and this may help to reduce cracking of concrete. Limestone powder improved concrete strength at early age. The difference in blast-furnace cement fineness did not have significant differences in compressive strengths, especially at 28 days. View Full-Text
Keywords: accelerated curing; ground granulated blast-furnace slag cement; autogenous shrinkage; drying shrinkage accelerated curing; ground granulated blast-furnace slag cement; autogenous shrinkage; drying shrinkage
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zulu, B.A.; Miyazawa, S.; Nito, N. Properties of Blast-Furnace Slag Cement Concrete Subjected to Accelerated Curing. Infrastructures 2019, 4, 69.

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