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Relation between Weight Status, Physical activity, Maturation, and Functional Movement in Adolescence: An Overview

Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Zagreb, Horvaćanski zavoj 15, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia
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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020031
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 16 May 2019 / Accepted: 29 May 2019 / Published: 30 May 2019
Obesity, low level of physical activity and dysfunctional movement patterns presents one of the leading health issues that can contribute to increased risk for developing not only metabolic and cardiovascular disease, but also musculoskeletal problems. The aim of this paper is to summarize literature and evidence about relationship between functional movement (FM) patterns, physical activity (PA) level and weight status in average adolescent population. In addition, this paper summarized current evidence about relations between maturation effects and functional movement among athletic adolescent populations. Summary of current evidence suggests that decreased physical activity level is negatively correlated to functional movement in adolescence. Additionally, most studies suggest that weight status is negatively correlated to functional movement patterns although there is conflicting evidence in this area. Evidence consistently showed that overweight and obese adolescents exhibit poorer functional movement compared to normal weight adolescents. In addition, it appears that maturation has effects on functional movement in athletic populations of adolescents. It is therefore important that practitioners consider interventions which develop optimal functional movement alongside physical activity and weight management strategies in children, in order to reduce the risks of injuries and pathological abnormality arising from suboptimal movement patterns in later life. View Full-Text
Keywords: FMS; pubescence; pediatric population; fundamental movement FMS; pubescence; pediatric population; fundamental movement
MDPI and ACS Style

Karuc, J.; Mišigoj-Duraković, M. Relation between Weight Status, Physical activity, Maturation, and Functional Movement in Adolescence: An Overview. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4, 31.

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