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Open AccessConcept Paper

Clinical Implementation of Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Patients: Adaptation of ACSM’s Guidelines to the Italian Model

1
Sports Medicine Center, Clinical and Experimental Department, School of Sports Medicine, University of Florence, 50100 Florence, Italy
2
Department of Sports Medicine, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA 90263, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Giuseppe Musumeci
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2010004
Received: 6 November 2016 / Revised: 23 December 2016 / Accepted: 30 December 2016 / Published: 13 January 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tailored Exercise in Patients with Chronic Diseases)
The goal of cancer treatment is to arrest or eradicate the tumor while minimizing the often toxic effects of treatment. While oncologic diagnostics and treatments are improving and survival rates are increasing, it is critical to provide additional patient management that appears to affect long-term survival. Epidemiologic evidence suggests patients diagnosed with cancer tend to fair better after treatment when following a comprehensive rehabilitation program aimed at achieving an ideal body weight through dietary and exercise interventions while also increasing cardiorespiratory fitness, strength, mobility, neuromuscular integrity and psycho-social wellbeing. Additionally, it is now being tested whether exercise during cancer treatment and possibly prior to the start of treatment may increase post treatment outcomes by altering body weight, having direct effects on tumorigenesis, reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, and perhaps increasing chemotherapy delivery efficacy. The purpose of this review is to outline an evidence based model to evaluate cancer patients and provide guidelines for post-cancer treatment rehabilitation programs. Additionally, strategies aimed at changing lifestyle habits such as smoking and poor dietary habits will be addressed. View Full-Text
Keywords: cancer; rehabilitation; physical activity; strength training; aerobic fitness; quality of life; survivor cancer; rehabilitation; physical activity; strength training; aerobic fitness; quality of life; survivor
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stefani, L.; Galanti, G.; Klika, R. Clinical Implementation of Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Patients: Adaptation of ACSM’s Guidelines to the Italian Model. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2017, 2, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2010004

AMA Style

Stefani L, Galanti G, Klika R. Clinical Implementation of Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Patients: Adaptation of ACSM’s Guidelines to the Italian Model. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology. 2017; 2(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stefani, Laura; Galanti, Giorgio; Klika, Riggs. 2017. "Clinical Implementation of Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Patients: Adaptation of ACSM’s Guidelines to the Italian Model" J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk2010004

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