Next Article in Journal
Spawning Induction of First-Generation (F1) Greater Amberjack Seriola dumerili in the Canary Islands, Spain Using GnRHa Delivery Systems
Previous Article in Journal
Administration of Probiotics in the Water in Finfish Aquaculture Systems: A Review
Article Menu
Issue 3 (September) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Fishes 2018, 3(3), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes3030034

Air Exposure in Catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) Modify Muscle Texture Properties: A Pilot Study

1
Departament of Biology, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, Instituto Universitario de Investigación Marina (INMAR), Universidad de Cádiz, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar (CEI-MAR), Av. República Saharaui s/n, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain
2
Departament of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar (CEI-MAR), Av. República Saharaui s/n, E-11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz, Spain
3
Instituto Español de Oceanografía (IEO), Centro Oceanográfico de Cádiz, Puerto Pesquero, Muelle de Levante, s/n, P.O. Box 2609, E-11006 Cádiz, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 29 August 2018 / Accepted: 31 August 2018 / Published: 4 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Welfare of Cultured and Experimental Fishes)
Full-Text   |   PDF [769 KB, uploaded 4 September 2018]   |  

Abstract

Sharks are captured by tons for human consumption. Improving the quality of their meat will produce fillets that may have a higher economic value in the market, and thus be beneficial for the management of this fishery. In other animal species destined for human consumption, a negative relationship between pre-slaughtering stress and meat quality has been demonstrated. By studying the commercial small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula), this work aimed at linking pre-slaughter handling of captured sharks and muscle fillets quality. An experimental group of adult and subadult living catsharks captured by hand and exposed to air (for 18 min, which is the minimum time this species is exposed to air in the fishing deck during fisheries procedures), and an undisturbed group, were evaluated. After air exposure, catsharks returned to water for recovery. Muscle lactate and water content were quantified after acute exposure (for 18 min), 5 h and 24 h. This challenge elicited stress responses in the muscle such as increased lactate levels and immediate dehydration, followed by recovery of lactate levels and overhydration. Muscle consistency, a relevant variable describing quality of seafood according to its ability to be swallowed by the consumer, paralleled muscle water content changes. The results indicated for the first time that handling alive sharks exposed to air results in muscle fillets with different texture properties. Whether these changes in muscle texture induce higher quality fillets has yet to be proven. Our recommendation is to minimize time of air exposure experienced by sharks when captured, including fast slaughtering instead of leaving them to die by asphyxia, as current on-board procedures. View Full-Text
Keywords: fisheries management; muscle texture; Scyliorhinus canicula; sharks; stress fisheries management; muscle texture; Scyliorhinus canicula; sharks; stress
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Barragán-Méndez, C.; Sánchez-García, F.; Sobrino, I.; Mancera, J.M.; Ruiz-Jarabo, I. Air Exposure in Catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) Modify Muscle Texture Properties: A Pilot Study. Fishes 2018, 3, 34.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Fishes EISSN 2410-3888 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top