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Nonconscious Cognitive Suffering: Considering Suffering Risks of Embodied Artificial Intelligence

1
Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, Università degli Studi di Torino (Consorzio FINO), 10123 Turin, Italy
2
Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies, John Cabot University, 00156 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Philosophies 2019, 4(2), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/philosophies4020024
Received: 11 April 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 17 May 2019
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Abstract

Strong arguments have been formulated that the computational limits of disembodied artificial intelligence (AI) will, sooner or later, be a problem that needs to be addressed. Similarly, convincing cases for how embodied forms of AI can exceed these limits makes for worthwhile research avenues. This paper discusses how embodied cognition brings with it other forms of information integration and decision-making consequences that typically involve discussions of machine cognition and similarly, machine consciousness. N. Katherine Hayles’s novel conception of nonconscious cognition in her analysis of the human cognition-consciousness connection is discussed in relation to how nonconscious cognition can be envisioned and exacerbated in embodied AI. Similarly, this paper offers a way of understanding the concept of suffering in a way that is different than the conventional sense of attributing it to either a purely physical state or a conscious state, instead of grounding at least a type of suffering in this form of cognition. View Full-Text
Keywords: artificial intelligence; embodiment; nonconscious cognition; applied ethics; s-risks artificial intelligence; embodiment; nonconscious cognition; applied ethics; s-risks
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Umbrello, S.; Sorgner, S.L. Nonconscious Cognitive Suffering: Considering Suffering Risks of Embodied Artificial Intelligence. Philosophies 2019, 4, 24.

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