Next Article in Journal
Build Your Own Microscope: Step-By-Step Guide for Building a Prism-Based TIRF Microscope
Previous Article in Journal
Safety and Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in Schizophrenia Spectrum and Other Psychotic Disorders: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessReview
Methods Protoc. 2018, 1(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/mps1040039

Review of Biomedical Applications of Contactless Imaging of Neonates Using Infrared Thermography and Beyond

1
Biomedical Engineering Division, University of Saskatchewan, Campus Dr 9, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A5, Canada
2
Section of Neonatology, Winnipeg Regional Health Authority, Winnipeg, MB R3B 1E2, Canada
3
Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 1C9, Canada
4
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 5V6, Canada
5
Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3A 1S1, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 14 August 2018 / Revised: 8 October 2018 / Accepted: 8 October 2018 / Published: 29 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Infrared Thermography: Applications and Integrations)
Full-Text   |   PDF [7590 KB, uploaded 29 October 2018]   |  

Abstract

The sick preterm infant monitoring is an intriguing job that medical staff in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) must deal with on a daily basis. As a standards monitoring procedure, preterm infants are monitored via sensors and electrodes that are firmly attached to their fragile and delicate skin and connected to processing monitors. However, an alternative exists in contactless imaging to record such physiological signals (we call it as Physio-Markers), detecting superficial changes and internal structures activities which can be used independently of, or aligned with, conventional monitors. Countless advantages can be gained from unobtrusive monitoring not limited to: (1) quick data generation; (2) decreasing physical and direct contact with skin, which reduces skin breakdown and minimizes risk of infection; and (3) reduction of electrodes and probes connected to clinical monitors and attached to the skin, which allows greater body surface-area for better care. This review is an attempt to build a solid ground for and to provide a clear perspective of the potential clinical applications of technologies inside NICUs that use contactless imaging modalities such as Visible Light Imaging (VLI), Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), and Infrared Thermography (IRT). View Full-Text
Keywords: preterm infants, NICU; neonatal imaging; physio-features, infrared thermography; optical coherence tomography; tissue optics; near-infrared; short-wave infrared; visible light preterm infants, NICU; neonatal imaging; physio-features, infrared thermography; optical coherence tomography; tissue optics; near-infrared; short-wave infrared; visible light
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

AlZubaidi, A.K.; Ethawi, Y.; Schmölzer, G.M.; Sherif, S.; Narvey, M.; Seshia, M. Review of Biomedical Applications of Contactless Imaging of Neonates Using Infrared Thermography and Beyond. Methods Protoc. 2018, 1, 39.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Methods Protoc. EISSN 2409-9279 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top