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Article

A New Classification of the Anatomical Variations of Labbé’s Inferior Anastomotic Vein

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Division of Anatomy, Department 1, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, RO-020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Division of Neurosurgery, Department 6—Clinical Neurosciences, Faculty of Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, RO-020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Clinic of Neurosurgery, “Dr. Bagdasar-Arseni” Emergency Clinical Hospital, RO-041915 Bucharest, Romania
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Department of Legal Medicine and Bioethics, Faculty of Dental Medicine, “Carol Davila” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, RO-020021 Bucharest, Romania
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Emilio Quaia
Tomography 2022, 8(5), 2182-2192; https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050183
Received: 22 July 2022 / Revised: 23 August 2022 / Accepted: 24 August 2022 / Published: 30 August 2022
(This article belongs to the Topic Human Anatomy and Pathophysiology, 2nd Volume)
(1) Background: The inferior anastomotic vein of Labbé (LV) courses on the temporal lobe, from the sylvian fissure towards the tentorium cerebelli and finishes at the transverse sinus (TS). The importance of the LV topography is related to skull base neurosurgical approaches. Based on the hypothesis of the existence of as yet unidentified anatomical possibilities of the LV, we aimed through this research to document the superficial venous topographic patterns at the lateral and inferior surfaces of the temporal lobe. (2) Methods: A retrospective cohort of 50 computed tomography angiograms (CTAs) of 32 males and 18 females was documented. (3) Results: Absent (type 0) LVs were found in 6% of cases. Anterior (temporal, squamosal–petrosal–mastoid, type 1) LVs were found in 12% of cases. LVs with a posterior, temporoparietal course (type 2) were found to be bilateral in 46% of cases and unilateral in 36% of cases. Type 3 LVs (posterior, parietooccipital) were found to be bilateral in 8% and unilateral in 32% of cases. In 24% of cases, duplicate LVs were found that were either complete or incomplete. A quadruplicate LV was found in a male case. On 78 sides, the LV drained either into a tentorial sinus or into the TS. (4) Conclusions: The anatomy of the vein of Labbé is variable in terms of its course, the number of veins and the modality of drainage; thus, it should determine personalized neurosurgical and interventional approaches. A new classification of the anatomical variations of Labbé’s vein, as detected on the CTAs, is proposed here (types 0–3). View Full-Text
Keywords: vein of Labbé; cerebral vein; tentorium cerebelli; tentorial sinus; superficial middle cerebral vein; computed tomography vein of Labbé; cerebral vein; tentorium cerebelli; tentorial sinus; superficial middle cerebral vein; computed tomography
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MDPI and ACS Style

Mincă, D.I.; Rusu, M.C.; Rădoi, P.M.; Hostiuc, S.; Toader, C. A New Classification of the Anatomical Variations of Labbé’s Inferior Anastomotic Vein. Tomography 2022, 8, 2182-2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050183

AMA Style

Mincă DI, Rusu MC, Rădoi PM, Hostiuc S, Toader C. A New Classification of the Anatomical Variations of Labbé’s Inferior Anastomotic Vein. Tomography. 2022; 8(5):2182-2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050183

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mincă, Dragoş Ionuţ, Mugurel Constantin Rusu, Petrinel Mugurel Rădoi, Sorin Hostiuc, and Corneliu Toader. 2022. "A New Classification of the Anatomical Variations of Labbé’s Inferior Anastomotic Vein" Tomography 8, no. 5: 2182-2192. https://doi.org/10.3390/tomography8050183

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