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Article

Biomechanical Modeling of Prosthetic Mesh and Human Tissue Surrogate Interaction

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA
2
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401, USA
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602, USA
4
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Biomimetics 2018, 3(3), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030027
Received: 7 August 2018 / Revised: 9 September 2018 / Accepted: 13 September 2018 / Published: 18 September 2018
Surgical repair of hernia and prolapse with prosthetic meshes are well-known to cause pain, infection, hernia recurrence, and mesh contraction and failures. In literature, mesh failure mechanics have been studied with uniaxial, biaxial, and cyclic load testing of dry and wet meshes. Also, extensive experimental studies have been conducted on surrogates, such as non-human primates and rodents, to understand the effect of mesh stiffness, pore size, and knitting patterns on mesh biocompatibility. However, the mechanical properties of such animal tissue surrogates are widely different from human tissues. Therefore, to date, mechanics of the interaction between mesh and human tissues is poorly understood. This work addresses this gap in literature by experimentally and computationally modeling the biomechanical behavior of mesh, sutured to human tissue phantom under tension. A commercially available mesh (Prolene®) was sutured to vaginal tissue phantom material and tested at different uniaxial strains and strain rates. Global and local stresses at the tissue phantom, suture, and mesh were analyzed. The results of this study provide important insights into the mechanics of prosthetic mesh failure and will be indispensable for better mesh design in the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: prosthetic mesh; hernia; pelvic organ prolapse; Prolene®; finite element prosthetic mesh; hernia; pelvic organ prolapse; Prolene®; finite element
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chanda, A.; Ruchti, T.; Upchurch, W. Biomechanical Modeling of Prosthetic Mesh and Human Tissue Surrogate Interaction. Biomimetics 2018, 3, 27. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030027

AMA Style

Chanda A, Ruchti T, Upchurch W. Biomechanical Modeling of Prosthetic Mesh and Human Tissue Surrogate Interaction. Biomimetics. 2018; 3(3):27. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030027

Chicago/Turabian Style

Chanda, Arnab, Tysum Ruchti, and Weston Upchurch. 2018. "Biomechanical Modeling of Prosthetic Mesh and Human Tissue Surrogate Interaction" Biomimetics 3, no. 3: 27. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics3030027

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