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Genealogy 2018, 2(4), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy2040047

The Rise and Fall of BritainsDNA: A Tale of Misleading Claims, Media Manipulation and Threats to Academic Freedom

1
Research Department of Genetics, Evolution and Environment, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
2
Melbourne Integrative Genomics, School of BioSciences and School of Mathematics & Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010, Australia
3
UCL Genetics Institute, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 17 July 2018 / Accepted: 22 September 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetic Genealogy)
Full-Text   |   PDF [461 KB, uploaded 2 November 2018]   |  

Abstract

Direct-to-consumer genetic ancestry testing is a new and growing industry that has gained widespread media coverage and public interest. Its scientific base is in the fields of population and evolutionary genetics and it has benefitted considerably from recent advances in rapid and cost-effective DNA typing technologies. There is a considerable body of scientific literature on the use of genetic data to make inferences about human population history, although publications on inferring the ancestry of specific individuals are rarer. Population geneticists have questioned the scientific validity of some population history inference approaches, particularly those of a more interpretative nature. These controversies have spilled over into commercial genetic ancestry testing, with some companies making sensational claims about their products. One such company—BritainsDNA—made a number of dubious claims both directly to its customers and in the media. Here we outline our scientific concerns, document the exchanges between us, BritainsDNA and the BBC, and discuss the issues raised about media promotion of commercial enterprises, academic freedom of expression, science and pseudoscience and the genetic ancestry testing industry. We provide a detailed account of this case as a resource for historians and sociologists of science, and to shape public understanding, media reporting and scientific scrutiny of the commercial use of population and evolutionary genetics. View Full-Text
Keywords: BBC; BritainsDNA: genetic genealogy; pseudoscience; genetic ancestry testing; academic freedom; science journalism; media studies BBC; BritainsDNA: genetic genealogy; pseudoscience; genetic ancestry testing; academic freedom; science journalism; media studies
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Kennett, D.A.; Timpson, A.; Balding, D.J.; Thomas, M.G. The Rise and Fall of BritainsDNA: A Tale of Misleading Claims, Media Manipulation and Threats to Academic Freedom. Genealogy 2018, 2, 47.

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