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Article

Caregivers’ Use of Child Passenger Safety Resources and Quality of Future Child Restraint System Installations

1
Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Campbell Hall 231, 1530 3rd Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35294-1170, USA
2
Minnesota Health-Solutions, Saint Paul, MN 55105, USA
3
Center for Injury Research and Prevention, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
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Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
5
Department of Emergency Medicine and Injury Prevention Center, Hasbro Children’s Hospital, Providence, RI 02903, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Raphael Grzebieta
Safety 2017, 3(4), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3040024
Received: 24 January 2017 / Revised: 23 September 2017 / Accepted: 23 October 2017 / Published: 24 October 2017
Objectives: Child Restraint System (CRS) misuse is common. We characterized caregivers’ use of child passenger safety informational and instructional resources and determined whether there were differences in the quality of CRS installations associated with prior exposure to specific resources as evaluated in a standardized CRS installation environment. Methods: Caregivers completed self-report surveys and installed a forward-facing CRS in a controlled environment. Installations were evaluated for security (tightness) and accuracy (no errors) by a child passenger safety technician (CPST). Results: CRS manuals were the most common way caregivers learned to install a CRS. Primary care providers (PCP)s were the most frequently endorsed source of CRS safety information. There was no strong pattern of associations between prior exposure to resources and installation quality (security or accuracy), although some evidence supports protective effects of learning from CPSTs; 13% (19 out of 151) installations were secure and 57% (86 out of 151) installations were accurate. Conclusions: A focus on developing effective and lasting behavioral interventions is needed. View Full-Text
Keywords: child passenger safety; child restraints; parenting; injury; disparities child passenger safety; child restraints; parenting; injury; disparities
MDPI and ACS Style

Mirman, J.H.; Seifert, S.J.; Metzger, K.; Durbin, D.R.; Arbogast, K.B.; Zonfrillo, M.R. Caregivers’ Use of Child Passenger Safety Resources and Quality of Future Child Restraint System Installations. Safety 2017, 3, 24. https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3040024

AMA Style

Mirman JH, Seifert SJ, Metzger K, Durbin DR, Arbogast KB, Zonfrillo MR. Caregivers’ Use of Child Passenger Safety Resources and Quality of Future Child Restraint System Installations. Safety. 2017; 3(4):24. https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3040024

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mirman, Jessica H., Sara J. Seifert, Kristi Metzger, Dennis R. Durbin, Kristy B. Arbogast, and Mark R. Zonfrillo 2017. "Caregivers’ Use of Child Passenger Safety Resources and Quality of Future Child Restraint System Installations" Safety 3, no. 4: 24. https://doi.org/10.3390/safety3040024

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