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A Systematic Review of Construction and Demolition Waste Management in Australia: Current Practices and Challenges
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Conceptualising the Circular Economy Potential of Construction and Demolition Waste: An Integrative Literature Review

1
School of Engineering, Design & Built Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia
2
Office of the Pro Vice Chancellor Research, Torrens University Australia, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia
3
School of Architecture, Art and Design, University of South Australia, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
4
School of Rural & Surveying Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Abdol R. Chini, Salman Shooshtarian and Tayyab Maqsood
Recycling 2021, 6(3), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/recycling6030061
Received: 30 July 2021 / Revised: 8 September 2021 / Accepted: 10 September 2021 / Published: 15 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Using Circular Economy Principles to Manage Construction Waste)
Traditionally, construction and demolition waste (CDW) materials have been considered to be unwanted, surplus, or wastage materials or materials with zero value. Such a conceptualisation only embraces a negative aspect, which underpins the disposal of reusable and recyclable CDW materials in landfills, thus damaging the circular economy and the environment. The scope of this research was to conceptualise the circular economy potential of non-hazardous construction and demolition waste, which can be used as a resource for advancing the circular economy and sustainability in the built environment. Thus, the abbreviation ‘CEPCDR’ is used for this purpose. The study employs an integrative literature review to understand in depth whether the rationale in the existing CDW definitions advocates for the circular economy. Instead, the literature showed that the current definitions mainly support quantitative, economic, or classification needs, respectively. That is because they lack consideration of the dynamic nature of CDW materials, which embraces the spatial and temporal dimensions. The former involves the geographic context in which the CDW phenomenon eventuates, while the latter concerns the lifecycle of materials. This study contributes to the body of knowledge by conceptualising the CEPCDR using a holistic approach that includes five dimensions: the social, economic, environmental, spatial, and temporal perspectives. Furthermore, the study seeks to drive future research in measuring the CEPCDR. View Full-Text
Keywords: construction and demolition waste; definition; legislation; circular economy; lifecycle construction and demolition waste; definition; legislation; circular economy; lifecycle
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MDPI and ACS Style

Papastamoulis, V.; London, K.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, P.; Crocker, R.; Patias, P. Conceptualising the Circular Economy Potential of Construction and Demolition Waste: An Integrative Literature Review. Recycling 2021, 6, 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/recycling6030061

AMA Style

Papastamoulis V, London K, Feng Y, Zhang P, Crocker R, Patias P. Conceptualising the Circular Economy Potential of Construction and Demolition Waste: An Integrative Literature Review. Recycling. 2021; 6(3):61. https://doi.org/10.3390/recycling6030061

Chicago/Turabian Style

Papastamoulis, Vasilios, Kerry London, Yingbin Feng, Peng Zhang, Robert Crocker, and Petros Patias. 2021. "Conceptualising the Circular Economy Potential of Construction and Demolition Waste: An Integrative Literature Review" Recycling 6, no. 3: 61. https://doi.org/10.3390/recycling6030061

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