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Potential of Briquetting as a Waste-Management Option for Handling Market-Generated Vegetable Waste in Port Harcourt, Nigeria

1
Pan African University Life and Earth Sciences Institute (including Health and Agriculture), University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Nigeria
2
Department of Wood Products Engineering, University of Ibadan, Ibadan 200284, Nigeria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Recycling 2018, 3(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/recycling3020011
Received: 8 March 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
The conversion of biomass to high-density briquettes is a potential solution to solid waste problems as well as to a high dependence on fuel wood in developing countries. In this study, the potential of converting vegetable waste to briquettes using waste paper as a binder was investigated. A sample size of 30 respondents was interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire at the D-line fruit and vegetable market in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Carrot and cabbage leaves were selected for briquetting based on their availability and heating value. This waste was sun-dried, pulverized, torrefied and fermented. Briquettes were produced with a manual briquette press after the processed vegetable waste was mixed with waste paper in four paper:waste ratios, i.e., 10:90, 15:85, 20:80 and 25:75. The moisture content, densities and cooking efficiency of the briquettes were determined using the oven-drying method, the water-displacement method, and the water-boiling test, respectively. There was no observed trend in moisture content values of the briquettes, which varied significantly between 3.0% and 8.5%. There was no significant variation in the densities, which ranged from 0.79 g/cm3 to 0.96 g/cm3 for all the briquette types. A degree of compaction above 300% was achieved for all the briquette types. Water-boiling test results revealed that 10:90 paper:sun-dried cabbage briquettes had the highest ignitability of 0.32 min. Torrefied carrot briquettes with 25% paper had the least boiling time and the highest burning rates of 9.21 min and 4.89 g/min, respectively. It was concluded that cabbage and carrot waste can best be converted into good-quality briquettes after torrefaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: briquetting; vegetable waste; solid-waste management; biomass briquetting; vegetable waste; solid-waste management; biomass
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Akande, O.M.; Olorunnisola, A.O. Potential of Briquetting as a Waste-Management Option for Handling Market-Generated Vegetable Waste in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Recycling 2018, 3, 11.

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