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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle

Suitability of Hydroponically-Grown Rumex acetosa L. as Fresh-Cut Produce

1
Department of Agriculture, Food and Environment, University of Pisa, 56124 Pisa, Italy
2
Interdepartmental Research Center Nutrafood “Nutraceuticals and Food for Health”, University of Pisa, 56124 Pisa, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Horticulturae 2020, 6(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6010004
Received: 29 November 2019 / Revised: 24 December 2019 / Accepted: 2 January 2020 / Published: 9 January 2020
Sorrel (Rumex acetosa L.) is a perennial wild herb appreciated as a folk medicine and for use in folk-traditional cuisines, and its nutraceutical properties are increasingly known and studied. Nowadays, there is a lack of knowledge about the possibility of using this species as fresh-cut produce, and no reports have investigated the physiological/biochemical changes of sorrel leaves upon storage. To test the aforementioned, sorrel seedlings were cultivated in a floating system and two consecutive harvests took place: The first cut at 15 days (C1) and second cut at 30 days (C2) after sowing. Fresh-cut sorrel leaves from C1 and C2 were stored in plastic boxes at 4 °C for 15 days and chlorophylls, carotenoids, total phenols, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, and antioxidant capacity were evaluated during the storage period. During storage, sorrel leaves from the same cut did not show significant changes in total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity, which represents a positive outcome for the maintenance of the nutraceutical value of this species. For this reason, sorrel may be a very promising species as a “new” fresh-cut leafy vegetable. However, some differences were observed between the two cuts, especially in the total flavonoid and the total ascorbic acid contents. While promising, further research will be necessary to standardize the yield and the nutraceutical content of this species in different cuts, which will be necessary to introduce and promote sorrel to consumers. View Full-Text
Keywords: sorrel; cold storage; wild herb; postharvest; bioactive compounds; hydroponic system; shelf-life sorrel; cold storage; wild herb; postharvest; bioactive compounds; hydroponic system; shelf-life
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ceccanti, C.; Landi, M.; Incrocci, L.; Pardossi, A.; Guidi, L. Suitability of Hydroponically-Grown Rumex acetosa L. as Fresh-Cut Produce. Horticulturae 2020, 6, 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6010004

AMA Style

Ceccanti C, Landi M, Incrocci L, Pardossi A, Guidi L. Suitability of Hydroponically-Grown Rumex acetosa L. as Fresh-Cut Produce. Horticulturae. 2020; 6(1):4. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6010004

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ceccanti, Costanza; Landi, Marco; Incrocci, Luca; Pardossi, Alberto; Guidi, Lucia. 2020. "Suitability of Hydroponically-Grown Rumex acetosa L. as Fresh-Cut Produce" Horticulturae 6, no. 1: 4. https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae6010004

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