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Review

Kluyveromyces marxianus: Current State of Omics Studies, Strain Improvement Strategy and Potential Industrial Implementation

1
Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica and National Chung Hsing University, Taipei 11529, Taiwan
2
Department of Life Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
3
Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
4
Innovation and Development Center of Sustainable Agriculture, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Fermentation 2020, 6(4), 124; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation6040124
Received: 6 November 2020 / Revised: 9 December 2020 / Accepted: 10 December 2020 / Published: 11 December 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ethanol and Value-Added Co-Products 2.0)
Bioethanol is considered an excellent alternative to fossil fuels, since it importantly contributes to the reduced consumption of crude oil, and to the alleviation of environmental pollution. Up to now, the baker yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most common eukaryotic microorganism used in ethanol production. The inability of S. cerevisiae to grow on pentoses, however, hinders its effective growth on plant biomass hydrolysates, which contain large amounts of C5 and C12 sugars. The industrial-scale bioprocessing requires high temperature bioreactors, diverse carbon sources, and the high titer production of volatile compounds. These criteria indicate that the search for alternative microbes possessing useful traits that meet the required standards of bioethanol production is necessary. Compared to other yeasts, Kluyveromyces marxianus has several advantages over others, e.g., it could grow on a broad spectrum of substrates (C5, C6 and C12 sugars); tolerate high temperature, toxins, and a wide range of pH values; and produce volatile short-chain ester. K. marxianus also shows a high ethanol production rate at high temperature and is a Crabtree-negative species. These attributes make K. marxianus promising as an industrial host for the biosynthesis of biofuels and other valuable chemicals. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioethanol; Kluyveromyces marxianus; omics technologies; gTME; CRISPR-Cas9 bioethanol; Kluyveromyces marxianus; omics technologies; gTME; CRISPR-Cas9
MDPI and ACS Style

Ha-Tran, D.M.; Nguyen, T.T.M.; Huang, C.-C. Kluyveromyces marxianus: Current State of Omics Studies, Strain Improvement Strategy and Potential Industrial Implementation. Fermentation 2020, 6, 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation6040124

AMA Style

Ha-Tran DM, Nguyen TTM, Huang C-C. Kluyveromyces marxianus: Current State of Omics Studies, Strain Improvement Strategy and Potential Industrial Implementation. Fermentation. 2020; 6(4):124. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation6040124

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ha-Tran, Dung M.; Nguyen, Trinh T.M.; Huang, Chieh-Chen. 2020. "Kluyveromyces marxianus: Current State of Omics Studies, Strain Improvement Strategy and Potential Industrial Implementation" Fermentation 6, no. 4: 124. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation6040124

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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