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Article

The Interaction of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Affects Fermentation-Derived Compounds in Wine

1
The University of British Columbia (UBC), Okanagan, Biology Department, 1177 Research Rd., Kelowna, BC V1V 1V7, Canada
2
Department of Wine and Food Science, The University of Adelaide, PMB1, Glen Osmond SA 5064, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ronnie G. Willaert
Fermentation 2016, 2(2), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation2020009
Received: 31 December 2015 / Revised: 17 March 2016 / Accepted: 18 March 2016 / Published: 30 March 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Yeast Biotechnology)
Previous winery-based studies showed the strains Lalvin® RC212 (RC212) and Lalvin® ICV-D254 (D254), when present together during fermentation, contributed to >80% relative abundance of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae population in inoculated and spontaneous fermentations. In these studies, D254 appeared to out-compete RC212, even when RC212 was used as the inoculant. In the present study, under controlled conditions, we tested the hypotheses that D254 would out-compete RC212 during fermentation and have a greater impact on key fermentation-derived chemicals. The experiment consisted of four fermentation treatments, each conducted in triplicate: a pure culture control of RC212; a pure culture control of D254; a 1:1 co-inoculation ratio of RC212:D254; and a 4:1 co-inoculation ratio of RC212:D254. Strain abundance was monitored at four stages. Inoculation ratios remained the same throughout fermentation, indicating an absence of competitive exclusion by either strain. The chemical profile of the 1:1 treatment closely resembled pure D254 fermentations, suggesting D254, under laboratory conditions, had a greater influence on the selected sensory compounds than did RC212. Nevertheless, the chemical profile of the 4:1 treatment, in which RC212 dominated, resembled that of pure RC212 fermentations. Our results support the idea that co-inoculation of strains creates a new chemical profile not seen in the pure cultures. These findings may have implications for winemakers looking to control wine aroma and flavor profiles through strain selection. View Full-Text
Keywords: Saccharomyces cerevisiae; strain interaction; fermentation-derived compounds Saccharomyces cerevisiae; strain interaction; fermentation-derived compounds
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gustafsson, F.S.; Jiranek, V.; Neuner, M.; Scholl, C.M.; Morgan, S.C.; Durall, D.M. The Interaction of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Affects Fermentation-Derived Compounds in Wine. Fermentation 2016, 2, 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation2020009

AMA Style

Gustafsson FS, Jiranek V, Neuner M, Scholl CM, Morgan SC, Durall DM. The Interaction of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Affects Fermentation-Derived Compounds in Wine. Fermentation. 2016; 2(2):9. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation2020009

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gustafsson, Frida S., Vladimir Jiranek, Marissa Neuner, Chrystal M. Scholl, Sydney C. Morgan, and Daniel M. Durall. 2016. "The Interaction of Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Affects Fermentation-Derived Compounds in Wine" Fermentation 2, no. 2: 9. https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation2020009

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